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KPFK FOLIO 

September 1974 




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Arnold Schoenberg F 
(1874-1951) ! 




Fourth Annual 

International Folk Festival 

and Ethnic Bazaar 

Here's the block-buster you've been waiting for. 12 hours non-stop, fantastic ethnic arts & 
crafts fair. Exciting, costumed exhibition groups. Folk dancing for all ages. Extra "Kolo 
Party" from 10:00 p.m., until midnight. Ethnic food. Beer & Wine. Beautiful facilities 
at the new Pasadena Center, 300 East Green Street.* Special attractions include the famous 
AMAN ORCHESTRA, ODESSA BALALAI KA ORCHESTRA and, just back from Yugoslavia, 
BORA GAJICKI teaching the latest dances of DOBRAVOJIA PUTNIK! Adm. $2, Kids, 50 1 
A beautiful benefit for KPFK, produced by MARIO CASETTA. 

SUNDAY SEPT 29 NOON TO MIDNIGHT 

•Ample parking— freeway close. 




THE VOLUNTEERS 

are all those people who donate their time and energy 
to keep this place going. They produce programs, 
review cultural events, edit tapes, type, file, answer 
phones— in short we would not be in existence without 
them. Due to space problems, the names listed here are 
only those which do not appear elsewhere in the Folio. 

Joe Adams, Ahna Armour, Laurie Alexandre, Keith Alleyne, 
David Aria, Susan Bechaud, Natalie Blasco, Stephen Blum. 
Dan Bottoms, Barbara Clairchide, Louise Chevlin, Peter Cole, 
Franci Cummings, Pete Cutler, John Desimio, Ken Dobruskin, 
Farley Egan, James Farrell, Debra Farrell, Amanda Foulger, 
Bea Garrett, Leon Goldin, Peter Gordon, Bob Gowa, Gael Gryphon, 
Ed Hammond, Burt Handelsman, James Harber, Lani Haverlin, 
Alison Hershey, Karl Heussenstamm, Carol Ann Jones, Alan Kanter, 
Dudley Knight, Barbara Kraft, Alma Landsberger , Elizabeth Luye, 
Helen Mackler, Karen Man, Maureen Mcllroy, Theresa McWhorter, 
Julie Mendoza, Sam Mittleman, David Morrison, Thomas Nast, 
Marsha Necheles, Richard Nielsen, Rich Polkinghorn, Kate Richman, 
Ron Ridenour, Ginny Roe, Gregg Roebuck, Ruth Seid, Wendy 
Sisson, Pearl Skotnes, Carta Spencer, Craig Spurgeon, Tom Stem, 
Sue Swedo, Ivan Thoen, Ed Thomas, Paul Vangelisti and all others 
whose names may have inadvertently been omitted. 

PACIFICA BOARD 

National: KPFA: R. Gordon Agnew, Joseph C. Belden, Peter N. 
Hagberg; KPFK: David B. Finkel, Robert H. Powsner, Peter Flaxman, 
Jonas Rosenfield, Jr.; KPFT: Dupuy Bateman, Michael R. Davis, 
Thelma Meltzer, Danny Samuels, WBAI : Ralph Engelman, George A. 
Fox, Caroly Goodman, Edwin A. Goodman, Ken Jenkins; PPS/PTL: 
Peter Tagger. 

Local: Roscoe Lee 8rowne, Mae Churchill, Digby Diehl, David 
Dworski, Moctezuma Ezparza, David Finkel, Peter Flaxman, Sam 
Francis, Frank Gehry, Leonard Goldman, Richard S Bunther, 
Brownlee Haydon, Hallock Hoffman, Celes King III, Robert Klein, 
Roger K. Leib, Warren Lanier, Allen Lenard, Louis Licht, Ronald M. 
Loeb, Herschel Lymon, Brian G. Manion, Millie Martinez, Jeffrey 
Matsui, Isabell Navar, Frederick Nicholas, Anais Nm, Marshall Perlman, 
John Phillips, Robert Powsner, Robert Radnitz, Joyce Reed Rosenberg, 
Jonas Rosenfeld Jr., Paul Saltman, Avery Schreiber, Marvin Segelman, 
Muriel Seligman, Pearl Skotnes, Frederic Sutherland, Peter Sutheim, 
Peter Tagger, Jolyon West, Tracy Westen, Haskel Wexler, Digby 
Wolfe, Frank Wyle, Floyd Yudelson, Irv Zeiger. Ex Officio: 
Will Lewis, Barbara Spark. 



The KPFK Folio is not sold; it is sent free to each subscriber 
supporting our nonprofit, non-commercial education station, and 
contains the most accurate possible listings of the programs broad- 
cast. Subscription rates are $25 per year, or $1 5 per year for 
students, retired, unemployed, etc. 

Our transmitter is on Mount Wilson. We broadcast in stereo 
multiplex with an effective radiated power of 1 12,000 watts. 
Our studios and offices are at 3729 Cahuenga Blvd., W., in 
North Hollywood 9I604. Phones: (213) 877-271 1 and 984-271 1. 

KPFK is owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non- 
profit institution. Subscriptions are transferable to the other 
Pacifica Stations: KPFA, 2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley CA, 
94704; WBAI, 359 E. 62nd St., NY I002I; and KPFT, 6I8 
Prairie St. Houston, TX 77002. jh.s month's cover by David Cloud 



KPFK 



September, I974 
90.7 FM 



± 



General Manager: 

Program Director: 

Music: 

News: 

Public Affairs: 



Production: 



Engineer: 

Promotion Director: 

Program Producer: 

Subscriptions: 

Business Manager: 
Community Events: 

Chief Bureaucrat: 
None of the Above: 

Folio Editor: 
Oct. '74 Editor: 



Will Lewis 

Ruth Hirschman 

Katherine Calkin 
David Cloud, Dir. 
Paul Vorwerk 

Carol Breshears, 
acting Director 
Dave Boxall 

Jim Berland, Director 
Barbara Cady 
Mike Hodel 
Earl Ofari 
Tim Rosenfeld 
Victor Vazquez 

Steve Hoffman 

Bob Lowe 

Tim McGovern 

Mark Rosenthal 

Peter Sutheim, Dir. 

Tiji 

Steve Tyler 

Don Wilson 

Barbara Spark 

Clare Spark 

Clay Delmar, Dir. 
Madeleine Stem 
Roger Zimmerman 

Midi Martinez 

Mario Casetta 

Roy Tuckman 

Lucia Chappelle 
Debbie Miller 
Emily Schiller 

Jane Gordon 

Vanalyne Green 



THE THIRD ANNUAL KPFK MERRIE CHRISTMAS FAIRE & COUNTRY CRAFTS MARKET 

is coming on December 18 to 23, 1974 
AND NEEDS YOUR HELP! 



Christmas Through the Ages: the excitement, the fun, the 
sharing, the pageantry and the true meaning of Christmas 
giving and the winter solstice with its promise of Spring. . . 
this is the theme for the Merrie Christmas Faire! 

This year; the Faire will be handled by KPFK staff, so the 
fruits of the labors of volunteers and participating crafts- 
people will benefit KPFK's operating budget, without a 
promoter's cut. Given the lessons of the past, a smaller, 
more select Faire is planned, with sensible limitations in 
each area. There will be a "Merrie Christmas" costume 
theme, but the theme will not be bound to a specific 
historical period: imaginative fantasy costumes will be 
welcomed, as well as costumes from all through the cen- 
turies. Demonstrations of crafting will be encouraged. 
Community groups with appropriate fund-raising projects 
are encouraged to contact us for possible inclusion of 
games booths or "wanderers." 

The Faire will be run by a collective of experienced KPFK 
personnel. Entertainment will be coordinated by Mario 
Casetta, publicity by Barbara Spark, business and "buck 
stopping" by Milli Martinez, and crafts and decor by 
John and Bjo Trimble. Since the last named may be less 
familia to our subscribers than the first three, an irre- 
verent biography follows: 

We have known John & Bjo Trimble, individually and col- 
lectively, almost all our lives, and found them the most de- 
lightful pair of creative people we know. This may seem 
life a very broad statement, considering the amazing num- 
ber of craftspeople proliferating today's Faires and other 
marketplaces, but the Trimbles have a special and unique 
talent of bringing those craftspeople together into an or- 
ganized display of talent. They also manage to make it a 
highly profitable venture for all concerned, while they're 
at it. 

During the past 14 years, John and Bjo Trimble have direct- 
ed a mobile art show, known as the International Science 
Fantasy Art Exhibition; mobile because it is put on in dif- 
ferent cities around the country— planned ahead to time, 
advertised within the group of people most likely to be in- 
terested, and then the show is put up, hung, displayed, 
auctioned off, dismantled and sent home-all within the 
space of 4 days! They average 2 or more shows per year, 
handlking anything from small shows of 40 artists, up to 
200 + artists and nearly 1000 pieces of work in one show. 

The Trimbles themselves are a mundane-looking pair, ef- 
fectively disguising their interests in the Medieval-oriented 
Society for Creative Anachronism, wildlife and conservation 



groups, and some heavy political and civic involvement. 
John Trimble is 39, Assistant Manager of a company devoted 
to the representation of rope and twine mills around the 
world. His interests in crafts have done much to convince 
large mills to turn out a greater variety of macrame twine 
than used to be found on the market. 

Bjo Trimble is a graphics design artist, with a B.A. in art 
and a special interest in crafts. She has taught classes for 
adults and children in many facets of crafting, and has or- 
ganized other teaching classes for the handicapped. She 
has written for The Mother Earth News and has formed 
Scrounge; a recycling program that has to be seen to be 
believed. 

Both the Trimbles are KPFK volunteers when time permits, 
and were quite active in trying to preserve the sanity of 
several good people during the 1973 KPFK Christmas 
Faire. They will be working for KPFK on a straight salary 
commiserate with the usual fees paid standard KPFK peo- 
ple—they have refused to work on a commission basis, 
on the theory that it engenders distrust among the artists 
and craftspeople when their director is trying to gain more 
commissions. So everyone will know where the money 
goes, and that their commissions will go to the KPFK 
operating budget instead of into someone's pocket. 

In a moment of pure insanity, they fell for a sad line from 
Milli Martinez, the business manager of KPFK, and Will 
Lewis— who stated he would rather return to jail than 
go through another Christmas Faire unless it was handled 
right— and accepted the job of handling the crafts and 
decoration part of the Faire. Because of this lapse in 
sensible thinking, they now need all the volunteer aid 
they can get, in all facets of putting on a Faire. 

If you have any questions about the Trimbles-and you 
have the right to ask, considering all-please call or 
write the station. We'll answer as best we can anything 
you want to know (our sex life is fine, thank you.) 
Due to the problems of the last Faire, we think it's 
only faire to invite queries about the Trimbles' abilities 
and qualifications, and references in regards to their 
abilities to handle crafts at the 1974 Christmas Faire. 




%> f^AV>U>-- 



Will you help? Fill out the form below and return it soonest! Thank you! 



Name 



Phone (days) 



Phone (eve) 



Address 



Zip 



When available: ( ) Days; ( ) Evenings; ( ) Weekends; ( ) Before Faire; ( ) During Faire 



( ) Artist: ( ) Calligraphy 

( ) Line Drawings 
( ) Design/layout 

( ) Decorations: ( ) Design 

( ) Execution 

( ) Driver: ( ) Goods 
( ) People 
( ) Messenger 

( ) Own car ; van 

truck ; cycle 



( ) Poster Distribution 

( ) Sewing 

( ) Clerical work: ( ) Before Faire 

( ) At Faire 

( ) After Faire 

( ) KPFK Booths: ( ) Drink Booths 

( ) Gift Booths 

( ) Gift-wrapping 

j ( ) Information 

other 



( ) Carpentry: ( ) Professional skills 

( ) Own tools 

( ) Skills only 

( ) Willing but rough 

( ) Go-fer (go-for-this, go-for-that. . . ) 

( ) General Volunteer 

( ) OTHER: Please detail 



Faire materials you might have free or low-cost access to: 

( ) Printing; ( ) Paper; ( ) Paper supplies;' ( ) fireproofing; ( ) Lumber; ( ) Hardware; ( ) Textiles; ( ) Gift-wrapping supplies; 

( ) Greenery; ( ) OTHER: Please specify 

Entertainers: 

Type of act: Experience: 

No. of people in act: 



Special needs (lighting, equipment, etc. 



No. of crew NOT also in act: 



* 



* 



The World Famous 
HOLLYWOOD PALLADIUM 
presents 

California's first 



ART DECO & ART NOUVEAU EXPOSITION 




October 2nd through October 6th 

1:00 p.m. to 10:00 daily 

Many of the Nation 's Foremost Dealers Will Be Represented 

plus 

Daily Entertainment 

FASHION SHOWS and 1920 - 1930 Movies 

The Hollywood Palladium SPEAKEASY & CAFE will be open for Your Convenience 

ADMISSION: ONLY S3. 00 



* 



'¥ 



Regular Programs 

and Series 

Here is a listing of all of our regular programs (alphabetically, by category), with their day and time. Check to see if any of 
your favorites have been rescheduled, and look into some of our new series. For more program detail and rebroadcast infor 
mation, see individual listings. Please remember that all times are approximate, rather than exact. 



PROGRAM: 



TIME: 



PROGRAM: 



TIME: 



Classical Music 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Chapel, Court & Countryside 
Cleveland Orchestra 
William Malloch Programme 
Monday Evening Concerts 
Music not for Export 
Noon Concert 
Sunday Opera 
Sunrise Concert 
Zymurgy 



Folk, Blues, Ethnic, Rock 

Captain Midnight 

Ethnic Music 
Folk Dance with Mario 
Folk Music (Davis) 
Folk Scene (Larmans) 
Many Worlds 
Mundo Chicano 
Music Black & White 
Nommo 

Preachin' the Blues 
Soft Core Phonography 



The Spoken Arts 

Apogee 

Contemporary Art Forum 

Critique 

Grass Roots Salon 

Carlos Hagen Presents 

Earwash 

Halfway Down the Stairs 

Hour 25: sf 

Morning Reading 

On Film. In Print 

Play of the Week 

Poetry— Live 

Sour Apple Tree 

Spectrum 

Trans 



Tues., 8:30 pm 
Mon., 10:30 pm 
Thurs., 8:30 pm 
Saturday, 10 pm 
Wed., 8:30 pm 
Sun., 7:30 pm 
Mon.-Fri., noon 
Sun., 1 pm 
Mon.-Fri., 6 am 
Sat., 8 pm 



Midnite, except 

Fri.& Sun. 

Mon., Wed., Fri., 10 am 

Tues., Thurs., 10 am 

Sat., 10:30 am 

Th.,4 pm.Sun., 930 pm 

Sun., 10:45 am 

Fri., 9 pm 

Tues., 4 pm. Sun. midnite 

Sat., 3 pm 

Sat., 1 :30 pm 

Fri/Sat., 2 am 



Thurs., 1 1:30 pm 

1st & 3rd Fridays, 3:30 pm 

Fri., 2 pm 

Fri , 330 pm 

Sun., 8:30 pm 

Sun., 6 am 

Sat., 9:30 am 

Fri:,1 1 pm 

Mon.-Fri., 9:30 am 

2nd& 4th Sat, 6:30 pm 

Wed., 2 pm 

1st & 3rd Fri., 8 pm 

Sun., 630 pm 

Tues., 2 pm 

Sat., 8 am 



News 

Morning news summary 
(plus calendar & commentary) 
Evening News 
Beyond the News 



Monotone News 

Public Affairs 

Among Consenting Adults 

Calendar of Events 

The Car Show 

Consumer Counsel 

Dealing 

Food for Thought 

Foreign Press 

From the Center 

Gay at Heart 

Gray Power 

Health Department 

Inside L.A. 

Labor Report 

La Raza Nueva 

Lesbian Sisters ■ 

A Look at the Listening 

No Appointment Necessary 

Organic Gardening 

The Other Minority 

Survive with Pleasure 

Women for Legislative Action 



Comment & Subjectivity 

Jack Ganss: Bio-Meditatron 

Dorothy Healey 

Herschel Lymon: Come to Life 

Charles Morgan 

Lowell Ponte 

William Winter: Analysis 

Margaret Wright on Schools 



Mon.-Fri.. 9 am 

Daily, 6 pm 

Mon.— Fri.. 645 pm. 

1 am. 9 am. Sun., 1230 pm 

During Captain Midnight 



2nd & 4th Tues., 1 1 pm 

Mon— Sat., 550 pm 

Sat., 12:30 pm 

Wed.. 7:15 pm 

Mon.-Fri., 5 pm 

Mon., 4 pm 

Fri., 7:30 pm 

Thurs., 1 1 a.m. 

3rd Tues.. 1 1 pm 

4th Mon., 1 1 pm 

2nd & 4th Wed.. 11:30 am 

Sat., 4:30 pm: Wed., 1 1 am 

Tues.. 7: 15 pm 

Mon., 8 pm 

1st Tues., 1 1 pm 

Mon., 7:15 pm 

Mon., 9:30 pm 

Wed., 4 pm 

1st Mon., 1 1 am 

Fri., 4 pm 

1st & 3rd Wed.. 1 1 30 am 



Sun., 9 am 

Sun., 11 30 am 

Sun., 10 am 

Fri., 7:15 pm 

2nd & 4th Fri, 8 pm 

Thurs.. 7:15 pm 

Sun., 5 pm 



Film of the Month 



September 13th is the third anniversary of the tragedy at 
Attica Prison in New York State. In memorium we pre- 
sent Cinda Firestone's brilliant new documentary, "Attica' 

Cinda Firestone struggled for nine months to get the 
footage from NET. The film is a tour de force of 
reportage which allows the facts of the tragedy to make 
their own indictment. There is a memorable joining of 
form and content: in the footage where the massacre 
was seen through the sights of the rifles, the prisoners 
dissolve in chaos, in wormlike configurations. The 
sound track and editing are impeccable. Scenes drama- 
tically shift back and forth from confrontations at the 
negotiating tables and inside the prison walls, building 
to the terrible climax. Critics have termed it devasta- 
tingly effective, perhaps the best documentary on a 
controversial subject ever made. 



SATURDAY, September 14th, 12:00 midnite* 
SUNDAY, September 15th, 12:00 noon 

At the New Vagabond Theater, 2509 Wilshire Blvd. 
(9 blocks east of Vermont). Seating by reservation, 
as space allows. Phone KPFK at 980-5735, 
between 1 1 :00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., beginning 
Wednesday the 1 1th. Reservation list leaves the 
station Friday, 6 p.m. Have your FOTMC card 
number ready when you call. The card must be 
shown at the theater as well. 

*NOTE: this month we are moving the Saturday screening 
to midnight instead of noon, but theater availability may 
necessitate a late change. ASK WHEN YOU PHONE 
YOUR RESERVATION. 




Who may attend Film of the Month Club screenings? 

FOTMC membership is open to any full-year KPFK subscri- 
ber who renews his/her subscription within 10. days of the 
first renewal billing, which contains the Film Club 
application card. 3729 Club members are automatically 
entitled to Film Club privileges, with the 3729 Club card 
serving in lieu of the FOTMC card. For further information, 
see the subscription form on the preceding page. 

Card holders may bring one guest, providing they so specify 
when making their reservations. There is a 50-cent service 
charge for guests in those months when we incur extraor- 
dinary expenses for film rental. This charge is waived for 
guests of 3729 Club members. If space permits, extra 
guests may be possible. Check on Friday afternoon. 



Highlights 

^ *# 



ARNOLD SCHOENBERG: THE FIRST 100 YEARS 

As part of our yearlong celebration of Arnold Schoenberg, 
marking a century since his birth, we will continue to 
feature a variety of his work. Some of the programs this 
month will be live; see program listings for details. 

"Gustav Mahler was a saint. Anyone who knew him even 
slightly must have had that feeling. . . " 



Dates and times of Schoenberg programs during Sept: 
(See daily listings for details) 




"My teachers were primarily Bach and Mozart, and sec- 
ondarily Beethoven, Brahms, and Wagner. . . I also learned 
much from Schubert and Mahler, Strauss and Reger too. 
I shut myself off from no one, and so I could say of myself: 
My originality comes from this— I intimately imitated 
everything I saw that was good. . . I venture to credit my- 
self with having written truly new music which, being 
based on tradition is destined to become tradition. 
"National Music" 

(All of Schoenberg's quotations in this Folio are from 
a new edition of his essays, Style and Idea, edited by 
Leonard Stein, to be publised soon by Faber and Faber, 
London. Copyright 1972 by Belmont Music Publishers. 
Reprinted by permission.) 



September 1 


- 1 


00 


p.m. 


3 


- 12:00 


noon 


4 


- 8 


30 


p.m. 


7 


- 8 


00 


p.m. 


11 


- 8 


30 


p.m. 


13 


- 12:00 


noon 


13 


- 8:00 


p.m. 


14 


- 8:00 


p.m. 


15 


- 1:00 


p.m. 


15 


-4:00 


p.m. 


17 


- 12:00 


noon 


18 


- 8 


30 


p.m. 


21 


- 8 


00 


p.m. 


25 


- 8 


30 


p.m. 


28 


- 8 


00 


p.m. 



"The question, whether modern music is suited for the 
radio, and how one might perhaps be adapted to the 
other, touches on questions of musical technique, radio 
technique and tast. I would ask of the radio that it 
should reproduce everything as it actually sounds. . . How 
could one educate the public for modern music?. . . The 
way to do this: frequently repeated performances, as 
well prepared as possible. I have long been pleading that 
an hour should be given over to modern music, at a time 
when its opponents will not greatly begrudge it; for 
example, an hour late at night, once or twice a week, 
perhaps after eleven. That could be handed over to modern 
music with no envious reactions. 

—"Modern Music on the Radio" 





i Jit rue 
•io.ce? 
so wh«»? 



of beggars 

of »torvlr»s ~»ople 

ma I, yr tooth 
oil. i know it is war 
& red. what 
mad* mo think 
i wd not moot you here? 

ctuart z. perkoff 



POEMS OF STUART PERKOFF 

This month KPFK will air several of the late poet's 
readings, on the first three Saturdays, at approximately 
7:30 p.m. 

"Aristodemos said that Eryximachos and Phaidros and 
others went away-he himself fell asleep, and as the nights 
were long took a good rest: he was awakened towards 
daybreak by a crowing of cocks, and when he awoke, the 
others were either asleep, or had gone away; there remained 
only Socrates, Aristophanes and Agathon, who were drink- 
ing out of a large goblet which they passed round, and 
Socrates was discoursing to them. Aristodemos was only 
half awake, and he did not hear the beginning of the 
discourse; the chief thing which he remembered was 
Socrates compelling the other two to acknowledge that 
the true artist in a tragedy was an artist in comedy also. 
To this they were constrained to assent, being drowsy, 
and not quite following the argument. And first of all 
Aristophanes dropped off, then, when the day was 
dawning, Agathon. Socrates, having laid them to sleep, 
rose to depart; Aristodemos, as his manner was, following 
him. At the Lyceum he took a bath and passed the day 
as usual. In the evening he retired to rest at his own home, 
-from Plato's Symposium 



THE NETWORK PROJECT 

We are sure that many listeners remember the Feedback 
series, produced by The Network Project. The programs 
dealt with the subject of media, how it is organized, 
financed, controlled and offered up for consumption, and 
they won the prestigious Armstrong Award. Now the peo- 
ple at Columbia University in New York, the originators 
of Feedback, have produced Matrix, a five-part series 
focusing on cable television. It airs at 10:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday evenings, and is rebroadcast during the afternoons. 

Organized in 1971, The Network Project has worked to 
decentralize control of communication and to deal with 
the process of media control over individuals and communi- 
ties. In addition to producing programs, the project has 
published its studies and initiated litigation in areas of 
public broadcasting and domestic communications 
satellites. 



10 



1 



Sun day 



6:00 



8:00 



9:00 

10:00 
10:45 
11:30 
12:30 

1:00 



5:00 

6:00 
6:30 

7:30 



Earwash 

Though parading under various titles this month, the 
godawful 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. Sunday morning slot con- 
tinues to be nothing more nor less than the left-field 
sideways satirical humor of Weird Williams, Tiji, 
Capt. Tripps and Mr. Lizard. Listeners, beware. 
(Old Radio, too) 

Musica Pacifica Series: Antiphonal Music of the 
Seventeenth Century 

Consorts of shawmns, cornetti, sackbuts, viols and 
singers joining together to explore the musical pos- 
sibilities of space. Works include In Eclesiis; 
Hodie Completi sunt; Saul. Saul was verfogst du 
mien? and the German Magnificat by Schutz. Also 
works by Monteverdi. The Pacifica Singers join a 
host of singers and players of early instruments, 
conducted by Paul Vorwerk. 

Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental exploration of states of 
consciousness. 

Come to Life: Herschel Lymon 

A human growth center of the air. 

Many Worlds: Mario Casetta 

Ethnic songs and dances from every corner of the world. 

Dorothy Healey 

A communist viewpoint, with open phones. 

Above and Beyond the News 

The best sections of hte previous week's Beyond the 
News. Interviews, reports from Washington, Sacramento, 
the world, etc. Produced by the News Department. 

Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-IX 

A complete performance of Schoenberg's great unfinished 
Biblical opera, Moses and Aaron. Hans Herbert Fiedler, 
speaker; Helmut Krebs. tenor; Choruses of the Hamberg 
Academy of Music and the North German Radio; Orch- 
estra of the North German Radio; Hans Rosbaud con- 
ducting (Columbia K3L 241) Fred Hyatt hosts and 
provides background and commentary 

Margaret Wright on Schools 

Telling it like it is, with open phones. 
The Sunday News: Sanford Fidell 
The Sour Apple Tree: Clare Spark 

Is there any redeeming social value to art 7 

Music Not for Export: The Australian Scene 

Peter Sculthorpe: Sun Music ///-Sydney Symphony 
orchestra/Sir Bernard Heinze; Tabuh-Tabuhan-Barry 
Heywood, Albert Setty, percussion; The New Sydney 
Woodwind Quintet; Morning Song; Red Landscape— 
The Austral String Quartet; Lanscape- Roger Woodward, 
piano. Presented by Joe Cooper 



8:30 Carlos Hagen Presents 

The Spirit and Presence of Death in Electronic Music. 
A brief survey on how a number of contemporary elec- 
tronic composers have tried to express in their compo- 
sitions the theme of death. 

9:30 Folkscene 

A program of traditional and contemporary folk music, 
with live performers and some records too. Hosted 
by the Larmons. 

12:00 Music Black and White 

Blues and bluegrass, hosted by Nawana Davis. 



Mon day 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 
10:00 "The Front Page" 

Ben Hecht's and Charles Mac Arthur's ode to the work- 
ing press, written in the 30's and curiously appropriate 
for today. If the play makes the profession of journal- 
ism sound glamorous, it also offers a portrait of the re- 
porter as an exploited, underpaid, harrassed victim of a 
ruthless business. Featuring Robert Ryan, Peggy Cass, 
Arnold Stong, Margaret Hamilton among others. 

11:45 Carl Sandburg Poems 

Since Sandburg was a S27.50/wk. journalist when he 
began his career as a poet, this reading is an appropriate 
coda to our play. Sandburg worked also as a railroad 
section hand, short-order cook, window washer, brick- 
layer, harvest hand, among other vocations. A veritable 
compendium of labor coalesced m the personna of this 
quintessential American. 

12:15 Labor Lore in the American Grain 

A background on labor union folk songs with Dr. Archie 
Green doing the introductions. (Originally from 
KVT-FM in 1970) 

1:30 The San Francisco General Strike of 1934 

This is the 40th anniversary of the San Francisco General 
Strike which has deeply affected the labor movement 
in the Bay Area since that time. The participants in 
that struggle tell their story of what happened and why 
the working population of San Francisco decided to 
stage a general strike. 

2:30 From the Yiddish: Poets of the Sweatshop 

Poet Aaron Kramer translates and reads from rich 
literary heritage born on the lower East Side. From the 
archives. 

3:00 Strange Unusual Evening 

A program of labor songs performed by Earl Robinson 
and friends as a tribute to the late Walter Reuther 



11 




LOOK AT MY ARM! I HAVE PLOUGHED AND PLANTED 
SOJOURNER TRUTH, abolit.on.st and fem.n.st 



3:45 Black Labor Struggles Remembered 

An interview with John T. Williams, veteran black 
teamster union organizer. Williams gives a personal 
view of his experience, and the experience of black wor- 
kers within the labor movement over the past 25 years. 

4:15 The Threat at Harvest 

A documentary report on the conflict between the Team- 
sters and the United Farmworkers in the Coachella Valley. 
This year the Teamsters have launched a S100.000 campaign 
to eliminate the United Farmworkers Union. Produced 
by KPFK's Victor Vazquez with field assistance from 
Sam Kushner First broadcast in June. 

5:15 The Epic Campaign of 1934: Upton Sinclair 

On the occassion of the opening of a photo exhibit 
at the L.A. County Museum about the depression years 
in America, Sinclair talked of his "end poverty in 
California" race for governor in 1934 A classic from 
the archives of 1964. 



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12 




"Pins and Needles" 

Originally produced by the International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union, in November, 1937, this re-creation of 
the W.P.A. musical includes Barbara Streisand. Accor- 
ding to David Dubinsky, and he should know, "with 
wonderful freshness, they sang of pay envelopes and pic- 
ket lines, of romance in the shop and Sundays in the 
park." They also gave us "Sing me a Song with Social 
Significance." 



7:00 Let Us Now Praise Laboring Men and Women 

KPFK presents a collage of labor news, history, music, 
poetry and comment. Produced by Public Affairs 
Department. 

9:00 What Have Women Done 

Based on the book published by the San Francisco 
Womens' History Group, this program documents the 
history of working women in the United States. Produced 
by Barbara Cady. 

10:00 In the Gloom of Mighty Cities 

Songs for Labor Day, produced by Mario Casetta, 

11:00 "The Cradle Will Rock" 

The original 1937 Mercury Theater Production, directed 
by Orson Welles, with narration and piano accompani- 
ment by composer Marc Blitzstein. The action takes place 
in Steeltown, USA, controlled by Mr. Mister, an anti- 
union demagogue. The work has the feeling of a political 
poster come to life, in the genre of a 1930's musical. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater reads this 
classic novel by Edith Wharton. We thought it would 
be fun to take a fresh perspective on a book usually 
associated with one's high school literature class. Edith 
Wharton, although herself a member of the New York 
aristocracy, writes about New Englanders of modest 
means in this, her most famous novel. 

10:00 Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from around the world, presented 
by Mario Casetta. 

11:00 Focus on Feminism 

A personal look at how the feminist movement affects 
the daily lives of women and men. What's happening and 
who's who in the Los Angeles feminist movement. 
Guests, comment, music and selected readings. Produced 
and moderated by Marcianne Miller. Todays topic: The 
Female Orgasm-How to Make It and Not Fake It 

12:00 Noon Concert: Arnold Schoenberg: The First 
100 Years-I 

What more appropriate way to begin a Schoenberg-fest 
than to present a talk on his life and work by pianist and 
conductor Leonard Stein, who was a pupil, assistant, and 
friend to the great Viennese master. Originally delivered 
at UCLA on October 29, I963, this introductory survey 
covers Schoenberg's whole creative career and includes 
musical examples and recordings of the composer's voice. 
Produced by David Cloud. Rebroadcast from January. 



13 



2:00 Spectrum 

With -Carlos Hagen. Sometimes new programs and some- 
times rebroadcasts by request 

3:00 Case Studies In Imperialism 

See Wednesday the 4th, at 1 1 :00 p.m. for details. 

4:00 Music Black and White 

Hosted by Nawana Davis. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Labor Report: Paul Rosenstein and Paul Schrade 

Each week the Labor Report program brings you news 
and analysis of the world of workers, and their unions. 
Through live and taped interviews, music and songs, and 
in-depth commentary it provides up-to-date coverage 
of what's happening to workers both inside and outside 
the labor movement. This month will focus on working 
conditions in the telephone industry, the upcoming nego- 
tiations in aerospace and extensive coverage of the 
United Farmworkers Union. 

7:00 Beyond the News 
7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Boston Symphony Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Bach: Suite No. 1 in C Major. Schuetz: Freuet euch 
des Herren— Kenneth Riegel, tenor; Seth McCoy, tenor; 
Ara Berbenan, bass. Stravinsky: Pulcinella—C\aud\ne 
Carlson, mezzo-soprano; Kenneth Riegel, tenor; David 
Evitts, baritone. Michael Tilson Thomas conducts. 
William Pierce hosts. Recorded with the Dolby "A" 
noise reduction system. Stereo. 

10:30 Matrix I: Cable Television— End of a Dream 

This program examines the emerging cable industry, and 
contrasts the medium's communication potential against 
its corporate and government constraints. Participants 
include Sol Schildause (Chief, FCC Cable Bureau); Alfred 
Stern (Chief Executive, Warner Cable); and others. 

11:00 Lesbian Sisters 

News and views of the Lesbian community; exploring the 
Lesbian culture. Women's music, poetry, discussion, 
guests, sometimes live performers, open phones. Hosted 
by Evan Paxton. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



Wednesd a y 



6:00 
9:30 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Privisional Theater reads this 
novel about New Englanders of modest means, written 
by Edith Wharton. 



11:00 Inside LA 

Earl Ofari selects highlights from his Saturday series. 

1 1 :30 Women for Legislative Action 

Hosted by Dorothy Eletz. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Bach: Organ Preludes and Fugues II; Michel Chapuis, 
organ; (Telefunken BC 25I0I). Katherine Calkin hosts. 
Stereo. 

1:55 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

2:00 Play of the Week: The Importance of Being 
Earnest 

In this play, Wilde celebrates "the true liar, with his 
frank, fearless statements, his superb irresponsibility, 
his healthy, natural disdain of proof of any kind" and 
roguishly assails the United States, "that country 
having adopted for its national hero a man, who, 
according to his own confession, was incapable of 
telling a lie." 

4:00 Food for Thought 

A different way of thinking about nutrition and health. 
Even recipes. Produced by Milli Martinez. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Charles Morgan: Commentary 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-X 

Historic recordings of the String Quartets Nos. 1 and 2 
performed by the Kolisch Quartet under the composer's 
supervision in 1937. Commentary and historical back- 
ground by David Cloud. 

10:00 The Mann Lectures 

Recorded by the Library of Congress, and an oft- 
requested favorite of KPFK listeners, the series includes 
4 topics discussed by the writer between 1942 and 
1949. Tonight: Nietzche's Philosophy in the Light 
of Contemporary Events. 

11:00 Case Studies in Imperialism 

Last April a Conference on Imperialism was held at USC 
Law School. This program will focus on selective 
excerpts from the 2-day affair to examine the various 
dimensions of world imperialist control mechanisms. 
Among the issues detailed are: strategies of control; 
economic and political benefits to the West; national 
liberation and independence movements; and Third 
World counter-strategies for development 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



10:00 Ethnic Music: Richland Women 



14 



Thu r s d a y 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham reading Edith Wharton's novel 
about New Englanders of modest means. 

9:25 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

10:00 Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and folkdances from around the world. 
Produced by Mario Casetta. 

11:00 From the Center: Global Problems and National 
Values 

A panel discussion. Can a program be developed that 
would stabilize consumption in rich countries and 
simultaneously accelerate development and cut popula- 
tion growth in poor countries? Panelists include 
George Brown, Jr. Seyom Brown, John Lawrence 
Hargrove, and Jonas Salk. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Music from the Netherlands 

Haydn: Symphony No. 89 in F; Mozart: Violin 
Concerto No. 4 (Herman Krebbers, soloist); Roussel: 
Suite in F; de Falla: Nights in the Gardens of Spain 
(Alicia de Larrocha, soloist): Chausson: Symphony 
in BFIat. Amsterdam Concergebouw Orchestra, 
Ernest Bour conducting and Hilversum Radio 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Jean Fournet conducting. 
Katherine Calkin hosts. Program material courtesy 
of Radio Nederland. Stereo. 

2:00 The Mann Lectures 

Rebroadcast from Wednesday the 4th, at 10:00 p.m. 

3:00 Matrix 

Rebroadcast from Tuesday the 3rd, at 10:30 p.m. 

3:30 The Afternoon Reading: A Hunger Artist 
Read by Lotte Lenya. . . from a short story by 
Franz Kafka. 

4:00 Folk Scene 

Hosted by Roz and Howard Larmon. 

5:00 Dealing 

Ne-vs and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 William Winter: News Analysis 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Cleveland Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3— Horacio 
Gutierrez, piano. Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5. 
Kazimierz Kord conducts. Robert Conrad hosts. 
Stereo. 



10:00 Krishnamurti 

". . . many of the things that concern human beings: 
. . . sorrow, love, and death. . . suffering, and whether 
it can ever end. . . what it means to love without all 
the tortures of love. . . whether the mind can ever be 
free from death. . " 

11:30 Apogee: Mitchell Harding 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



Fri d a y 



6:00 
9:30 



10:00 
11:00 



12:00 



2:00 
2:30 
3:30 
4:00 

5:00 

6:00 
6:40 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham reads Edith Wharton's famous 
novel about New England life. 

Ethnic Music: East Meets West 

With Satya of Bombay and Mario Casetta. 

Soviet Report: William Winter 

KPFK News Analyst William Winter took a portable 
tape recorder along on his recent Study Tour of the 
Soviet Union— Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev, Tbilisi, 
Tashkent and Samarkand. He recorded conversations 
with many people on many subjects, comments by 
guides, a visit to elementary school, songs, and dances, 
etc. He w.ill present a series of one-hour reports 
with these recordings, once a week, beginning 
this morning. The series will continue regularly 
on Friday at this time. 

Noon Concert 

Music from the Soviet Union 
Dmitri Shostakovich introduces new works by 
young Soviet composers, followed by complete 
performances of both of Shostakovich's Cello 
Concertos, with Mstislav Rostropovich as soloist 
and the composer's son, Maxim Shostakovich, 
conducting. Katherine Calkin hosts. Program 
material courtesy of Radio Moscow. Monaural. 

Critique 

A look at current books, film, theater, music. 

Poetry— Live 

Rebroadcast from Friday the 30th of August, at 8:00 p.m. 

Grass Roots Salon 

Decia Baker interviews local artists. 

Survive with Pleasure 

The biggest part of survival: being aware of the current 
reality. Wina Sturgeon hosts, with guests and 
open phones. 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

The Evening News 

Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 



15 



6:45 Consumer Report 
7:00 Beyond the News 
7:30 Foreign Press 

Arab: Professor Hassan El Nouty, UCLA. 
Israeli: Oded E'dan, correspondent for Israeli 
State Radio. 

8:00 Lowell Ponte 

Right-wing anarchist viewpoint, with open phones. 

9:00 Mundo Cnicano 

Music and guests of interest to the Chicano community, 
hosted by Antonio Salazar. 

11:00 Hour 25: sf 

The only sf radio show in Southern California 
continues to present John Henry Thong, Katherine 
Calkin and Mike Hodel. This is an alternative? 

2:00 Soft Core Phonography 

Mellow music and old radio, hosted by Jay Lacey. 



7:00 Poems of Stuart Perkoff 

Here is the poet in an early 1961 reading for KPFK. 
A brief introduction by Stafford Chamberlain 
(then Drama and Literature director) on censorship, 
opens the program. The first in our month-long 
series of his work, aired at this time. 

8:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XI 

Schoenberg and the Viennese milieu-Alexander von 
Zemlinsky: Lyric Symphony (Slavka Taskova-Paoletti 
and Siegmund Mimsgern, soloists; Saarland Radio 
orchestra; Gabriele Ferro conducting); Franz Schrecker; 
Chamber Symphony for 23 Instruments (North German 
Radio Symphony Orchestra; Gianpiero Taverna 
conducting); Schoenberg: Song of the Wood Dove 
from "Gurrelieder" (Lili Chookasian, contralto; 
Boston Symphony Orchestra; Erich Leinsdorf con- 
ducting; RCA LSC 2785) David Cloud provides 
commentary. Program material courtesy North Gernam 
Radio and Saarland Radio. Stereo. 

10:00 The William Malloch Programme 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt conducted by 
the critic, composer, and former KPFK music director. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



Sat u r d a y 



8:00 



Trans: The Collective Star 

A blending musical group that describes itself as a 
"bridging sound" from the popular rock/jazz idiom 
to higher forms of consciousness. They draw upon 
various chants & consciously balance different 
sounds & energies to create their "music of the 
mantric wave." A. Foulger talks with Paul Silbey, 
its founder, plus musical selections. 

9:30 Halfway Down the Stairs 

With Uncle Ruthie (Buell). Songs, stories, and other 
stuff for children and even some adults. 

10:30 Folk Music: John Davis 
12:30 The Car Show 

John Retsek and Jack Kirkpatrick talk about your car 
in language you don't have to be a mechanic to under- 
stand. Open phones 

1:30 Preachin' the Blues: Bruce Bromberg 

3:00 Nommo 

Contemporary soulsounds, with Tambuzi Nyamavu. 

4:30 Inside L.A. 

Examining social, political and cultural happenings 
in L.A. Featuring guests, interviews, commentary by 
Ron Ridenour, and jazz interludes. Produced by 
Earl Ofari. 

5:50 Weekend Calendar: Terry Hodel 

6:00 The Saturday News: Larry Moss 

6:30 On Film: Stephen Mamber 

6:45 In Print: Bob Gottlieb 



8 



Sun day 



6:00 



8:00 



9:00 

10:00 
10:45 
11:30 

12:30 



1:00 
5:00 



Trance 

Morning Mystics. Captain Tripps and Tiji bless 
your ears with profound meditative revelations. 
A poetic new awareness audio montage set to 
music. Debra, Karl, Amanda— watch out! 
Thank you, Dr. Tim. 

Musica Pacifica Series: Music of the Fourteenth 
Century 

Music of Landini, Ciconnia and other Italian trecento 
masters as well as popular dances and music by Ma- 
chaut and by the 14th Century mannerists. Singers 
and players of medieval instruments directed by Paul 

Vorwerk. 

I 

Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental exploration of the states 
of consciousness. 

Come to Life: Herschel Lymon 

A human growth center of the air. 

Many Worlds: Mario Casetta 

Ethnic songs and dances from every corner of the world. 

Dorothy Healey 

A communist viewpoint, with open phones 

Above and Beyond the News 

The best sections of the previous week's Beyond the 
News. Interviews, reports from Washington, Sacramento, 
the world, etc. Produced by the News Department. 



The Sunday Opera 
Margaret Wright on Schools 



16 



7:30 Music not for Export: The Australian Scene 

Margaret Sutherland: Haunted Hills- Melbourne 
Symphony Orchestra/John Hopkins: The Young- 
Kabbarli-Caro\ Kohler, soprano; Genty Stevens, 
mezzo-soprano; Dean Patterson, baritone; John 
McKenzie, bass-baritone; Chamber Orchestra/ 
Patrick Thomas. Presented by Joe Cooper 

8:30 Carlos Hagen Presents 

Sounds of Chile before and after the fall of Allende. 
A year after the military takeover, Carlos Hagen 
presents the songs, music and sounds that could 
be heard in Chile during the Allende years and 
those heard after his fall. 

9:30 Folkscene 

A program of traditional and contemporary folk music, 
with live performers and some records too. Hosted 
by the Larmons. 

12:00 Music Black and White 

Blues and bluegrass, hosted by Nawana Davis. 



6:45 Conservative Commentary: Bob Karp 

A view from the right side. 

7:15 Beyond the News 



7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 LaRazaNueva 

Of, by and for the Chicano community. A discussion 
of what's Happening, and why. Hosted by Moctezuma 
Ezparza. 

9:30 No Appointment Necessary: The Professionals 

Tonight, Dr. Dick Huemer invites you to "Ask the Doctor.' 

10:30 Chapel, Court and Countryside: Renaissance and 
Early Baroque Music 

Lamentatio Jeremiae Prophetae. Three settings of the 
Lamentations of Jeremiah by Thomas Tallis, Tomas 
Luis de Victoria, and Robert White. Katherine Calkin 
hosts. Rebroadcast. Stereo. 



Mon day 



11:30 Redealing 

The best of the previous week's Dealing segments. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 
9:30 



10:00 
11:00 



12:00 



2:00 

4:00 
5:00 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater reads Edith 
Wharton's classic novel about age, sickness and sexual 
repression in a New England community 

Ethnic Music 

Sounds of the Caribbean, with Sandy Jules. 

The Other Minority 

Mitch Pomerantz hosts this monthly feature on problems 
of the handicapped, and some proposed solutions. Live 
discussions with guests and open phones. 

Noon Concert 

Music from Sweden. 

Allan Pettersson: Barefoot Songs-Kar\ Sjunnesson, 
baritone; Carl Rune Larsson, piano (Expo Norr RIKS EP 
3). Sonatas Nos. 1 , 5, 6, and 7 for Two Violins— Erik 
Rohn and Bernhard Hamman, violins (Sveriges Radio 
RELP 1119). Mesto for String Orc/iejrra-Swedish 
Radio Symphony Orchestra. Stig Westerberg conductor 
(Swedish Society Discofil SLT 33203). Symphony No. 
7— Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, Antal Dorati 
conductor (Swedish Society Discofil SLT 33194). 
David Cloud hosts. Stereo. 

Let Us Now Praise Laboring Men and Women 

Rebroadcast from Monday the 2nd, at 7:00 p.m. 

Organic Gardening 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, featuring commentaries, 
guests, and Terry Hodel's daily calendar. Produced by 
Barbara Cady. 



10 



Tue s d a y 



6:00 The Evening News 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater reading 
Edith Wharton's best-known novel. 

10:00 Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from around the world, presented 
by Mario Casetta. 

11:00 Focus on Feminism 

A personal look at the feminist movement and how it 
affects the daily lives of women and men. What's happen- 
ing and who's who in the Los Angeles feminist movement. 
Guests, comment, music and selected readings. Produced 
and moderated by Marcianne Miller. Today, Has Libera- 
tion killed Romance 7 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Music from Belgium 

Pierre Bartholomee: Romance; Karel Goeyvaerts: 
Comte tenu; Philippe Boesmans: Fanfare No. 2; Paul- 
Baudion Michel: Puzzlefonie; Henri Pousseur: Icarus; 
Isang Tun: Sonorous Pipes; Zbigniew Tursky: The 
Shadow; Frederick Rzewski: Les Moutons de Panurge: 
Julius Eastman: Creation. Katherine Calkin hosts. 
Program material courtesy of Belgian Radio. Stereo. 

2:00 Spectrum 

With Carlos Hagen. Sometimes new programs and some- 
times rebroadcasts by request. 

3:00 Adventures of a Dope Smuggler 

Check Wednesday the 12th, at 1 1 :00 p.m. for details. 



17 



4:00 Music Black and White 

Hosted by Nawana Davis. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Labor Report: Paul Rosenstein and Paul Schrade 

The Labor Report program brings you news and analysis 
of the world of workers and their union. Through live 
and taped interviews, music and songs, and in-depth com- 
mentary it provides up-to-date coverage of what's happen- 
ing to workers both inside and outside the labor movement. 
This month will focus on working conditions in the tele- 
phone industry, the upcoming negotiations in aerospace 
and extensive coverage of the United Farm Workers Union. 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Boston Symphony Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Haydn: Symphony No. 88 in G Major. Opera arias 
by Haydn, and Clmarosa — Evelyn Lear, soprano; Thomas 
Stewart, baritone. Haydn: Lord Nelson Mass— Evelyn 
Lear, soprano, Claudine Carlson, mezzo-soprano; 
Seth McCoy, tenor; Thomas Stewart, baritone; 
Susan Palmatier, mezzo-soprano; Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus. Eugene Ormandy conducts. William Pierce 
hosts. Recorded with the Dolby "A" noise reduction 
system. Stereo. 

10:30 Matrix II: Communications Satellites— The New 
Web 

This program examines the introduction of a new medium 
for information management destined to have profound 
impact on future generations. Participants include 
Harry Olssen (Attorney, CBS); Francis Ruddy (General 
Counsel, USIA); Philip Klass (Writer, Aviation Week 
and Space Technology) . and others 

11:00 Among Consenting Adults 

An attempt to break down the walls of fear and ignorance 
about sex which still exist in today's "Liberated Society." 
Hosts Barbara Spark and Jeremy Shapiro invite you to 
participate by phone. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 
9:30 



10:00 



11:00 



11 



Wed n e s d a y 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Edith Wharton's novel about age, sickness 

and sexual repression in a New England community, 

read by Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater. 

Ethnic Music: Richland Women 

Produced by Joanne Erde and Roberta Friedman. 

Inside LA 

Earl Ofari hosts this program of excerpts from his 
Saturday program 



11:30 
12:00 

1:55 
2:00 

4:00 

5:00 

6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 



8:30 



10:00 



11:00 



Women for Legislative Action 

Hosted by Dorothy Eletz. 

Noon Concert 

Bach: Organ Preludes and Fugues //Michel Chapuis, 
organ (Telefunken BC 25100). Katherine Calkin hosts. 
Stereo. 

Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 
Play of the Week: The Rose Tattoo 

A play by Tennessee Williams. "Desire is rooted in 
a longing for companionship, a release from the lone- 
liness which haunts every individual." 

Food for Thought 

A different way of thinking about nutrition and health. 
Even recipes. Produced by Milli Martinez. 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

The Evening News 

Charles Morgan: Commentary 

Beyond the News 

Open Hour 




Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XII 

Historic recordings, made in 1937 under the composer's 
supervision, of the String Quartets Nos. 3 and 4. The per- 
formers are the Kohsch Quartet. David Cloud provides 
background and historical perspective. 

The Mann Lectures 

Recorded by the Library of Congress, and an oft- 
requested favorite of KPFK listeners, the series 
includes 4 topics discussed by the writer between 
1942 and 1949 Tonight: Goethe and Democracy. 

Adventures of a Dope Smuggler 

Ar» in-depth interview with Jerry Kamstra, author 
of Weed: Adventures of a Dope Smuggler, the best- 
seller which traces the methods and techniques involved 
in the dope smuggling racket through the Mexican Con- 
nection. Included in the program are excerpts from 
the book. 



12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



18 



12 



Thu r $ d a y 



13 



Fn d a y 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:25 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater reading 
Edith Wharton's novel about New England life. 

10:00 Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from all around the world, 
presented by Mario Casetta. 

11:00 From the Center: Limiting U.S. Destructive Power 

A panel discussion exploring the threat of defense spending, 
including Clark Clifford, Herbert York, Gloria Emerson, 
and others. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Musica Iberia: Spanish and Portuguese music from 
1 100-1600 as interpreted by the Early Music Quartet 
(Telefunken SAWT9620). Katherine Calkin hosts. 
Stereo. 

2:00 The Mann Lectures 

Rebroadcast from Wednesday the 1 1th, at 10:00 p.m. 

3:00 Black Labor Struggles Remembered 

Rebroadcast from Monday the 2nd, at 3:45 p.m. 

3:30 Matrix 

Rebroadcast from Tuesday the 20th, at 10:00 p.m. 

4:00 Folk Scene 

Hosted by Roz and Howard Larmon. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 William Winter: News Analysis 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Cleveland Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Bach: Suite No. 2. Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No. 1- 
Gary Graffman, piano. Beethoven: Symphony No. 5. 
Kazimierz Kord conducts. Robert Conrad hosts. Stereo. 

10:30 Krishnamurti 

". . . the tremendous importance of the human mind 
undergoing a radical revolution. . . because we are the 
world and the world is us. . ." 

11:30 Apogee: Mitchell Harding 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Arnold Graham of the Provisional Theater reads 
Edith Wharton's novel about age, sickness, and 
sexual repression in a New England community. 

10:00 Ethnic Music: East Meets West 

With Satya of India and Mario of West Hollywood. 

11:00 Soviet Report: William Winter 

KPFK News Analyst William Winter took a 
portable tape recorder along on his recent Study 
Tour of the Soviet Union— Moscow, Leningrad, 
Kiev, Tbilisi, Tashkent and Samarkind. The results 
of his conversations with people in the Soviet 
Union will be presented weekly on Fridays. 

12:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-ll 

On this program, works which may be said to represent 
the "spiritual" or "humanistic" side of Schoenberg's 
nature: Kol Nidre, Op. 39 (Victor Braun, speaker; 
Festival Singers of Toronto; CBG Symphony Orches- 
tra; Robert Craft conducting; Columbia MZS 709), 
A Survivor from Warsaw, Op. 46 (Sherill Milnes, 
speaker; New England Conservatory Chorus; Boston 
Symphony Orchestra; Erich Leinsdorf conducting; 
RCA LSC 7055), Dreimal Tausand Jahre, Op. 50a; 
De Profundi's, Op. 50b; Modern Psalm, Op. 50c 
(Festival Singers of Toronto; CBC Symphony Orchestra; 
Robert Craft conducting; Columbia MZS 709 and 
780), Die Jacobsleiter (Guenther Reich, Neil Howlett, 
baritones; Francesco Poli, Nico Boer, Arjan Blanken, 
tenors; Lieuwe Visser, bass; Gertie Charlant, soprano; 
Radio Philharmonic Orchestra and Choirs of the 
Netherlands Broadcasting Foundation; Bruno Maderna 
conducting-from the 1972 Holland Festival). David 
Cloud, KPFK's Music Director, reads the texts of some of 
the Modern Psalms on which Schoenberg was working 
at the time of his death in 1951 Stereo. Rebroadcast 
from January. 

2:30 The Sour Apple Tree 

Clare Spark selects a past program to rebroadcast. 

3:30 Contemporary Art Forum 

Clark Polak hosts this international and local news 
and opinion program on the contemporary visual 
arts. 

4:00 Survive with Pleasure 

The biggest part of survival: being aware of the current 
reality. Wina Sturgeon hosts, with guests and open phones. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:40 Report to the Listener 

6:45 Consumer Report 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Foreign Press 

Africa: Professor Michael Lofchie, UCLA 
France: Georges Cleyet. 



19 




"To understand the very 
nature of creation one must 
acknowledge that there was 
no light before the Lord said: 
"Let there be Light." And 
since there was no light, the 
Lord's omniscience embraced 
a vision of it which only His 
omnipotence could call 
forth. We poor human beings, 
when we refer to one of the 
better minds among us as a 
creator, should never forget 
what a creator is in reality. 
A creator has a vision of s 
something which has not 
existed before this 
vision. And a creator has 
the power to bring his 
vision to life, the power to 
realize it." 
"Composition with 
Twelve Tones", 1941 



20 



8:00 



9:00 



11:00 



2:00 



8:00 



9:30 

10:30 
12:30 

1:30 
3:00 

4:30 

5:50 
6:00 
6:30 



Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XIV 

A live broadcast from the campus of the University of 
Southern California— a banquet in honor of the various 
guests, musical, academic, and civic, gathered to celebrate 
the Schoenberg Centennial. After-dinner speeches and 
anecdotes, and some unusual music— Schoenberg's 
arrangements for small instrumental ensemble of two 
waltzes by Johann Strauss (performed by student musicians 
from USC conducted by Anthony Vazzana) and a com- 
plete performance of the Brettl-lieder (Caberet Songs) 
(performed by Marni Nixon, soprano, and Leonard 
Stein, piano). David Cloud hosts. Stereo. 

Mundo Chicano 

Music and guests of interest to'the Chicano community, 

hosted by Antonio Salazar. 

Hour 25: sf 

Science, science fiction and radio. A dangerous 
mixture, stirred by Kathy Calkin, John Henry Thong 
and Mike Hodel 

Soft Core Phonography 

Mellow music and old radio, hosted by Jay Lacey. 



14 



Sat u r d a y 



Trans: What is Bahai? 

Bahai-past, present and future. J. Farrell talks with 
people from various talks of life, all of whom are active 
members of the Bahai faith. With musical selections 
from the Bahai choir specially recorded for the series. 

Halfway Down the Stairs 

Songs, stories, fun for kids and others. With Uncle Ruthie. 

Folk Music: John Davis 
The Car Show 

De-mystify your car with Jack Kirkpatrick and John 
Retsek. 

Preachin' the Blues: Bruce Bromberg 

th Tambuzi Nyamavu. 



Nommo 

Contemporary soulsounds 



Inside L.A. 

Examing social, political and cultural happenings in 
L.A, Featuring guests, interviews, commentary by Ron 
Ridenour, and jazz interludes. Produced by Earl Ofari. 

Weekend Calendar: Terry Hodel 
The Saturday News: Larry Moss 

Poems of Stuart Perkoff 

This reading took place in Venice on a summer night 
in 1971 Stuart had returned after an absence of 
several years. He'd been through the heavy drug exper- 
ience, family changes, and served years of prison time; 
it's ten years after our first reading last week, and the 
poetry tells it best. (Part two of a three part series 
on the poet.) 



8:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XV 

A live chamber music concert direct from the campus of 
the University of Southern California. String Trio, Op. 
45 (Kathleen Lenski, violin; Paul Polivnick, viola; 
Jeffrey Solow, cello); Four Songs.Op. 2, and Two Songs, 
Op. 14 (Betty Allen, mezzo-soprano; Leonard Stein, 
piano); and Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 21 (English translation 
by Ingolf Dahl and Carl Beier) (Su Harmon, sprech- 
stimme; instrumental ensemble conducted by Herbert 
Zipper). David Cloud hosts. Stereo. 

10:00 The William Malloch Programme 

A music (mostly classical) treasure hunt conducted by 
the critic, composer, and former KPFK music director. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 



8:00 



9:00 

10:00 
10:45 
11:30 
12:30 

1:00 



15 



Sun d a y 



Apogosh 

When the outer becomes the inner and the inner 
becomes the outer, where then are we? Apogosh: 
the point at which everything falls apart. Mitchell 
Heartless examines the question, "What is a Creep?" 

Musica Pacifica Series: Music of Elizabethan 
England 

A world premiere. Edward Cansino's An Experiment 
of Love based upon an ancient black-magic grimoire 
account of a love talisman ceremony, composed 
especially for the ensemble. Also madrigals, lute 
songs, and viol consorts by Weelkes, Byrd, Farrabosco, 
Bevin and Dowland. Directed by Paul Vorwerk. 

Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental exploration of states of 
consciousness. 

Come to Life: Herschel Lymon 

A human growth center of the air. 

Many Worlds: Mario Casetta . 

Ethnic songs and dances from every corner of the world. 

Dorothy Healey 

A communist viewpoint, with open phones . 

Above and Beyond the News 

The best sections of the previous week's Beyond the 
News. Interviews, reports from Washington, Sacramento, 
the world, etc. Produced by the News Department. 

Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XVI 

An operatic triple bill -Schoenberg's three short stage 
works. Erwartung, Op 17; Helga Pilarczyk, soprano; 
Washington Opera Society Orchestra; Robert Craft con- 
ducting (Columbia M2S 679) ; Die Glueckliche Hand, Op. 
Robert Oliver, bass; Columbia Symphony Orchestra and 
Chorus; Robert Craft conducting (Columbia M2S 679) 
Von Heute auf Morgen, Op. 32; Heather Harper, soprano; 
Erika Schmidt, soprano; Derrick Olsen, baritone; Herbert 
Schachtschneider, tenor; Royal Philharmonic Orch- 
estra conducted by Robert Craft (Columbia M2S 780). 
Fred Hyatt hosts and provides historical background. 
Stereo. 



21 



4:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XVII 

Live and in stereo from the campus of the campus of 
the University of Southern California, an all-Schoenberg 
orchestral program Chamber Symphony No. 2, Op. 38; 
Song of the Wood Dove from "Gurrelieder" (version for 
small orchestra by Schoenberg) (Betty Allen, mezzo- 
soprano); Begleitungsmusik, Op. 34; Concerto for 
Cello and Orchestra (after Monn) Laurence Lesser, 
soloist). Gerhard Samuel conducts the Debut Orchestra 
of the Young Musicians Foundation. David Cloud hosts. 

6:00 The Sunday News: Sanford Fidell 



6:30 



7:30 



8:30 



9:30 



12:00 



The Sour Apple Tree: Clare Spark 

Is there any redeeming social value to art? 

Music Not For Export: The Australian Scene 

Richard Meale: Coruscations- Roger Woodward, piano; 
Plateau— Adelaide Wind Quintet. Las Alboradas— Ron 
Ryder, violin; Peter Richardson, flute; Douglas 
Trengove, horn; Nigel Butterly, piano; Richard 
Meale, conductor; Clouds Now and Then; Homage 
to Garcia Lorca— West Australian Symphony 
Orchestra/John Hopkins. 

Carlos Hagen Presents 

Carlos Hagen produced a number of programs on 
Chile where he examined the various forces and 
elements that led to the fall of Allende. His approach 
brought a large amount of cricism from botH the 
right and the left. Carlos Hagen now re-broadcasts 
the major portions of his answer program to those 
critics. 

Folkscene 

A program of traditional and contemporary folk 
music, with live performers and some records too. 
Hosted by the Larmons. 

Music Black and White 

Blues and bluegrass, hosted by Nawana Davis. 



16 



Mon day 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Ethan Frome 

Although Edith Wharton came from the New York 
aristocracy, her most famous novel deals with New 
Englanders of modest means. Arnold Graham of the 
Provisional Theater reads this novel made familiar to 
most of us in high school literature classes. 

10:00 Ethnic Music 

Sandy Jules hosts this thrice weekly tribute to music 
from the Caribbean. 

11:00 Viet Nam: Distortion and Reality 

On March 18, I974, Congressman Dickenson and 
former prisoners of war expressed their views in response 
to the lobbying efforts of the Indochina peace 
campaign to end funding to the government of South 
Viet Nam. Their views are contrasted with the exper- 
iences of former POW Bob Chenowith, Jane Barton 
of the AFSC and Congressman Ron Dellums. Produced 
by Victor Bedoian. 



12:00 



2:00 



4:00 
5:00 

6:00 
6:45 

7:00 
7:30 
8:30 



9:30 
10:30 



11:30 
12:00 



Noon Concert 

Mozart: The six Piano Trios; Beaux Arts Trio (Phillips 
World Series PHC 2-022). Katherine Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

Felix Krull by Thomas Mann 

A reading from Mann's last novel and a testament to the 
greatness of the artist who never fails to surprise. The 
intellectual presence of the literary world gives us, as his 
final bequest, a wonderfully irresistable young comic 
hero. Read by Ann Sunkergaard from the Pacifica 
archives. 

Organic Gardening 

Dealing 

A 60-minute journal featuring commentaries, guests, 
adventures and Terry Hodel's daily calendar Produced 
by Barbara Cady. 

The Evening News 

Conservative Commentary: Bob Karp 

A view from the right side 

Beyond the News 
Open Hour 
La Raza Nueva 

An Escalator that goes round 7 Why not? Gilbert Luna 
has built a small scale working model of a Spiral 
Staircase Escalator. The inventor will discuss his pro- 
ject with host Moctezuma Esparza and guest. Bill 
Ryan of the U.S. Marketing Institute. Produced 
by Victor Vazquez. 

No Appointment Necessary: The Professionals 

Tonight's professional is astronomer Steve Kilston. 

Chapel, Court and Countryside: Renaissance and 
Early Baroque Music 

Seven tears figured in seven passionate pavans. The 
Lacrimae of John Dowland. What is it? Tune in and find 
out. Katherine Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

Redealing 

The best of the previous week's Dealing segments. 
Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



17 



Tue s d a y 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

A novella by Leo Tolstoy, and read by Bill Hunt. 

10:00 Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from around the world, presented 
by Mario Casetta. 

11:00 Focus on Feminism 

A personal look at the feminist movement, with a 
special look at the LA. scene. Guests, comment, music 
and selected readings. Today the subject is: The Lesbian 
Mother. 



22 



12:00 Noon Concert: Arnold Schoenberg-The First 
100 Years-XVIII 

A program of music by Schoenberg and some of his 
disciples. Schoenberg: Three Little-Orchestra Pieces 
(International Kranichsteiner Chamber Ensemble: Bruno 
Maderna conducting: Mainstream MS 5008): Hanns 
Eisler: Die Roemische Kantate (Liliana Poli, soloist: 
Wergo60051): EgonWellesz: Octet (Vienna Octet: 
London Sts I5243): Webern: Six Pieces for Orchestra, _ 
Op 6: Serg: Three Pieces for Orchestra. Op. 6: 
Schoenberg: Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16 
(1949 revisionl; Columbia Symphony Orchestra: 
Robert Craft conducting (Columbia MS 6216). David 
Cloud hosts with comments and historical background. 
Stereo. 

2:00 Spectrum 

With Carlos Hagen. Sometimes new programs and some- 
times rebroadcasts by request. 

3:00 What Women Have Done 

Rebroadcast from Monday the 2nd, at 9:00 p.m. 

4:00 Music Black and White 

With Nawana Davis as host. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Labor Report: Paul Rosenstein and Paul Schrade 

News and analysis of the world of workers and their unions. 
This month will focus on working conditions in the tele- 
phone industry, the upcoming negotiations in aerospace 
and extensive coverage of the United Farm Workers Union. 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Boston Symphony Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Mozart: March in D Major, K. 249. Five Canons, K 
553-Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Requiem in D minor, 
K 626-Benita Valente, soprano: Claudine Carlson, mezzo- 
soprano: Kenneth Riegel, tenor: Ara Berberian, bass; 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus. Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts. William Pierce hosts. Recorded with the Dolby 
"A" noise reduction system. Stereo. 

10:30 Matrix III: Global TV-Spreading the Word 

This program examines the propaganda activities of 
USIA and its Voice of America, construction of broad- 
cast systems by private foundations and the U.S. Agency 
For International Development, and the foreign distri- 
bution of American educational programming. Parti- 
cipants include Theodore Conant (Director of Research, 
The Schroeder Bank); Frank Shakespear (Former Dir- 
ector, USIA); Jack Hood Vaughn (Director for Interna- 
tional Operations, Children's Television Workshop); 
, and others. 

11:00 The Gay Radio Collective Hour 

An Audio-magazine for L.A.'s gay community, with 
the Gay Radio Collective. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



18 



Wed n e s d a y 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Leo Tolstoy's novella, read by Bill Hunt. 

10:00 Ethnic Music: Richland Women 

Produced by Joanne Erde and Roberta Friedman. 

11:00 ' Inside LA 

Earl Ofari selects excerpts from his Saturday program. 

11:30 Women for Legislative Action 

Hosted by Dorothy Eletz. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Bach. Trio sonatas and Schuebler Chorales for organ; 
Michel Chapuis, organ. (Telefunken BC 25098). 
Katherine Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

1:55 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 
2:00 Play of the Week: Major Barbara 

A play by George Bernard Shaw, in 2 parts (continued 
next Wednesday.) "You have made for yourself some- 
thing that you call a morality or a religion or what not. 
It doesn't fit the facts. Well, scrap it. Scrap it and 
get one that does fit. That is what is wrong with the 
world at present. It scraps its obsolete steam engines and 
dynamos; but it won't scrap its old prejudices and its 
moralities and its old religions and its old political consti- 
tutions. . . If your old religion broke down yesterday, 
get a newer and better one for tomorrow." 

4:00 Food for Thought 

A different way of looking at nutrition and health. Even 
recipes. Produced and hosted by Milli Martinez. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Charles Morgan: Commentary 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Open Hour 

8:30 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XIX 

Historic recordings of two live performances of chamber 
music by Schoenberg. Suite, Op. 29 (world premiere); 
Instrumental ensemble conducted by Arnold Schoenberg; 
Phantasy for Violin with Piano Accompaniment, Op. 47 
(world premiere); Adolf Koldofsky, violin; Leonard 
Stein, piano. David Cloud provides commentary. 

9:30 The Mann Lectures 

Recorded by the Library of Congress, and an oft- 
requested favorite of KPFK listeners. The series 
includes 4 topics discussed by the writer between 
1942 and 1949. Tonight: Germany and the Germans. 



23 



10:45 Swanwhite by Strindberg 

From the Scandinavian writer whose vision was usually 
dark, we have this play. In an original production 
from The Mind's Eye Theatre at WBAI in 1969. 
Preceeded by some of the incidental music for this 
play by Jean Sibelius. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



10:30 Krishnamurti 

". . the question of religion, its relationship to daily 
life; and whether there is something or not. . .an 
amazing unnamable, a timeless state of mind. . . 
One can call it enlightenment, a realizations of the 
absolute truth. . ." 

11:30 Apogee: Mitchell Harding 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



19 



Thu r s d a y 



6:00 
9:25 
9:30 

10:00 
11:00 



12:00 



2:00 

3:30 

4:00 

5:00 

6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 
8:30 



Sunrise Concert 

Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Tolstoy's novella read by Bill Hunt. 

Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from all around the world, 
presented by Mario Casetta. 

From the Center: The Imperatives of Institution 
Building 

Panel discussion on the need for international 
institutions in our increasingly interdependent world. 
Panelists include Pauline Frederick, Elizabeth Mann 
Borgese, Richard A. Falk, and others. 

Noon Concert 

Music from Italy 

Berio: El Mar La Mar; Donatoni: Etwas Ruhiger in 
Ausdruck; Bussotti: Memoria; Maderna: Hyperion; 
Donatoni: Doubles II. RAI Symphony Orchestras of 
Rome and Milan and the London Sinfonietta. David 
Cloud hosts. Program material courtesy of Radio 
Italiana. Stereo. 

The Mann Lectures 

Rebroadcast from Wedensday the 18th, at 9:30 p.m. 

Matrix 

Rebroadcast from Tusday the 17th, at 10:30 p.m. 

Folk Scene 

Hosted by Roz and Howard Larmon. 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

The Evening News 

William Winter: News Analysis 

Beyond the News 

Open Hour 

Cleveland Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6. Stravinsky: Movements 
for piano and orchestra— Michel Beroff, piano. 
Capriccio- Michel Beroff, piano. Prokofiev: Scythian 
Suite. Aldo Ceccato conducts. Robert Conrad hosts. 
Stereo. 



20 



Fri d a y 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Bill Hunt reads Leo Tolstoy's novella. 

10:00 Ethnic Music 

With Satya and Mario. 

11:00 Soviet Report: William Winter 

KPFK News Analyst William Winter took a portable 
tape recorder along on his recent Study Tour of the 
Soviet Union— Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev, Tbilisi, 
Tashkent, and Samarkand. He recorded conversations 
with many people on many subjects, comments 
by guides, a visit to elementary schools, songs, 
dances, etc. These weekly programs are the result 
of his travels. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Music from France 

Milhaud: Le bal martiniquais (for 2 pianos): Paris (for 
4 pianos); Saint-Saens: Four Preludes and Fugues (for 
Organ); Roussel: Impromptu (for harp); Pierne: 
Concertstueck (for harp and Orchestra); Bizet: Jeux 
d'enfants (orchestra version); Ibert: Concertino for 
Saxophone and Orchestra. David Cloud hosts. Program 
material courtesy ORTF (French Radio): Stereo. 

2:00 Critique 

A look at current films, theater, books. 

2:30 Poetry-Live 
3:30 Grass Roots Salon 

Decia Baker interviews local artists. 

4:00 Survive with Pleasure 

Wina Sturgeon looks at survival, with guests and open 
phones. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:40 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

6:45 Consumer Report 

7:30 Foreign Press 

Press survey from Radio Sweden. 



24 



8:00 Lowell Ponte 

Right-wing anarchist viewpoint, with open phones. 

9:00 Mundo Chicano 

Music and guests of interest to the Chicano community. 
Hosted by Antonio Salazar. 

11:00 Hour 25: sf 

Sf, as you hear it. Mike Hodel, Katherine Calkin 
and J. Henry Thong. 

2:00 Soft Core Phonography 

Mellow music and old radio schticks, with Jay Lacey. 



8:00 



9:30 

10:30 
12:30 

1:30 
3:00 

4:30 

5:50 
6:00 
6:30 
6:45 
7:00 



8:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XX 

Historic recordings of three live performances of orchestral 
works by Schoenberg. Prelude to the Genesis Suite, Op. 44 
(world premiere): Janssen Symphony Orchestra and ■ 
Chorus conducted by Wermer Janssen; Concerto for String 
Quartet and Orchestra (after Handel) (American premiere); 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra; Otto Klemperer con- 
ducting; Orchestral transcription of Brahms' Piano Quartet 
in G Minor (world premiere); Los Angeles Philharmonic 
Orchestra; Otto Klemperer conducting. David Cloud 
provides commentary. 

10:00 The William Malloch Programme 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt conducted by 
the critic, composer, and former KPFK music director. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



21 



Sat u r d a y 



Trans: What is Bahai? 

Part 2. James and Dorothy Nelson, both prominent 
in the legal profession, talk with J. Farrell on the active 
application of their spiritual principles tp public life. 
With musical selections from the Bahai choir specially 
recorded for the series. 

Halfway Down the Stairs 

Songs, stories, fun for kids and others. With 
Uncle Ruthie. 

Folk Music: John Davis 

The Car Show 

De-mystify your car with Jack Kirkpatrick and John 
Retsek. 

Preachin' the Blues: Bruce Bromberg 

Nommo 

Contemporary soulsounds, with Tambuzi Nyamavu. 

Inside L.A. 

Examining social, political and cultural happenings in 
L.A. Featuring guests, interviews, commentary by Ron 
Ridenour, and jazz interludes. Producec by Earl Ofari. 

Weekend Calendar: Terry Hodel 
The Saturday News: Larry Moss 
On Film: Stephen Mamber 
In Print: Bob Gottlieb 
Poems of Stuart Perkoff 



6:00 



8:00 



9:00 

10:00 
10:45 
11:30 
12:30 

1:00 



22 



Sun d a y 



5:00 
6:00 



Goon Concert 

Peter Sellers conducts, Harry Secombe directs. Spike 
Milligan hosts, the BBC triumphs and Earwash takes 
the day off to bring you 2 hours worth of Goon shows. 

Musica Pacifica Series: The 1610 Vespers by 
Claudio Monteverdi 

As the final concert of the series, the complete collection 
of Psalms, concerti, and sacri-affetti. The singers and 
instrumentalists of Musica Pacifica joined by the 
Pacifica Singers. Maurita Thornburgh, Anne Turner, 
sopranos; Jonathan Mack, Dennis Parnell, tenors; 
Myron Myers, Lloyd Bunnell, basses. 

Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss 
Experiential, experimental exploration of states of 
consciousness. 

Come to Life: Herschel Lymon 

A human growth center of the air. 

Many Worlds: Mario Casetta 

Ethnic songs and dances from every corner of the world. 

Dorothy Healey 

A communist viewpoint, with open phones. 

Above and Beyond the News 

The best sections of the previous week's Beyond the 
News. Interviews, reports from Washington, Sacramento, 
the world, etc. Produced by the News Department. 

The Sunday Opera 

Wagner: Goetterdaemmerung. Wolfgang Wmdgassen, 
Thomas Stewart, Gustav Neidlinger, Josef Greindl, 
Birgit Nilsson, Ludmilla Dvorakova, Martha Doedl, 
Marga Hoeffgen, Annelies Burmeister, Anja Silja, 
Dorothea Siebert, Helga Dernesch, Sieglmde Wagner. 
The Chorus and Orchestra of the Bayreuth Festival 
are conducted by Karl Boehm (Philips 6747 049). 
Fred Hyatt hosts. Stereo. 

Margaret Wright on Schools 

Telling it like it is, with open phones. 

The Sunday News: Sanford Fidell 



25 



6:30 The Sour Apple Tree: Clare Spark 

Is there any redeeming social value to art? 

7:30 Music Not For Export: The Australian Scene 

George Dreyfuss: Symphony No. 7-Melbourne 
Symphony Orchestra/Ladislav Slovak; Sextet for 
Didjeridu and Winds-George Winunguj, didjeridu; 
Adelaide Wind Quintet; Jingles— West Australian 
Symphony Orchestra/Sir Bernard Heinze. Presented 
by Joe Cooper. 

8:30 Carlos Hagen Presents 

Reflections on Death A conversation with Czech 
physician Stanislav Grof and his wife, anthropologist 
Joan Halifax-Grof. Both ahve done extensive work, inclu- 
ding LSD therapy, to help terminal patients in their 
final transition from life. The program is neither morbid 
nor sad but very inspiring and is complemented with 
ritual music from various cultures 

9:30 Folkscene 

A program of traditional and contemporary folk music, 
with live performers and some records too. Hosted 
by the Larmons-. 

12:00 Music Black and White 

Blues and bluegrass, hosted by Nawana Davis. 



6:45 Conservative Commentary: Bob Karp 

A view from the right side. 

Beyond the News 
7:30 Open Hour 
8:30 La Raza Nueva 

Heavy Whiskers and Chunky Mama go through the motions 
motions tonight. Listen in as host Moctezuma Esparza 
reviews the works of El Teatro Popular de Vida y Muerte. 
Produced by Victor Vazquez. 

9:30 No Appointment Necessary: The Professionals 

Tonight's professional is social psychiatrist Isidore 
Ziferstein. 

10:30 Chapel, Court and Countryside: Renaissance and 
Early Baroque Music 

Monteverdi: Mass in Four Parts (1640). Missa In illo 
tempore. Katherine Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

11:30 Redealing 

The best of the previous week's Dealing segments. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 



23 



Mon day 



Sunrise Concert 



9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

This short story by Leo Tolstoy is read by Bill Hunt. 

10:00 Ethnic Music 

Sounds of the Caribbean, hosted by Sandy Jules. 

11:00 Gray Power 

Exploring the problems and the joys mixed together 
in the aging process. Produced by Aurelia Morris, with 
open phones. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Music from Canada 

Francois Morel: Departs; Ikki; Radiance. Bruce Mather: 
Madrigal III. Gilles Tremblay: Champs I; Souffles; Vers. 
Ensemble de la Societe de Musique Contempcraine du 
Quebec; Serge Garant conducting. David Cloud hosts. 
Program material courtesy of Radio Canada. Stereo. 

2:00 German Literature Immigrates to California 

Karl Pringsheim presents his document of the literary 
heritage that moved into the hills of Los Angeles with the 
onset of fascism. 

3:00 The San Francisco General Strike of 1934 

Rebroadcast from Monday the 2nd, at 1 :30 p.m. 
4:00 Organic Gardening 
5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, a 60-minute journal featuring 
commentaries, guests, adventures and Terry Hodel's daily 
calendar. Produced by Barbara Cady. 



6:00 
9:30 

10:00 
11:00 



12:00 



2:00 

3:00 
4:00 
5:00 



24 



Tue s d a y 



6:00 The Evening News 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Leo Tolstoy's novella, read by Bill Hunt. 

Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from around the world, 
presented by Mario Casetta. 

Focus on Feminism 

A personal look at how the feminist movement affects 
the daily lives of women and men. Also, what's 
happening and who's who in the Los Angeles feminist 
movement. Guests, comment, music, and selected 
readings. Produced and moderated by Marcianne 
Miller. Today's topic: Women and Psychiatry. 

Noon Concert 

Music from Japan 

Brahms: Serenade No. 1, Sadao Bekku: Concerto for 
Violin and Orchestra (Yuriko Kuronuma, soloist); 
Schumann: Symphony No. 4, Op. 120. NHK 
Symphony Orchestra; Kiroshi Wakasugi conducting. 
David Cloud hosts. Program material courtesy of NHK- 
Japan Broadcasting Corporation. Stereo. 

Spectrum 

With Carlos Hagen. Sometimes new programs, some- 
times rebroadcasts by request. 

Cops and Computers 

See Wednesday the 25th, at 11:00 p.m. for details. 

Music Black and White 

Hosted by Nawana Davis. 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 



26 



6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Labor Report: Paul Schrade and Paul Rosenstein 

News and analysis of the world of workers and their 
unions. This month will focus on working conditions 
in the telephone industry, the upcoming negotiations 
in aerospace and extensive coverage of the United Farm 
Workers Union. 



7:00 Beyond the News 
7:30 Open Hour 



8:30 Boston Symphony Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Bach: Suite No. 3 in D Major. Brandenburg Concerto 
No. 1 in F Major. Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in 
D Major-Kar\ Richter, harpsichord: Joseph Silverstein, 
violin; Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute. Brandenburg 
Concerto No. 4 in G Major— Joseph Silverstein, violin; 
Doriot Anthony Dwyer, James Poppoutsakis, flutes. 
Karl Richter conducts. William Pierce hosts. Recorded 
with the Dolby "A" noise reduction system. Stereo. 

10:30 Matrix IV: The Networks' Mission-Selling 
the Word 

This program examines the international expansion of 
U.S. commercial TV networks and the cultural, econ- 
omic and political effects of this penetration. Parti- 
cipants include Kevin O'Sullivan (President, World- 
vision); Thomas McManus (President, NBC Interna- 
tional); and others. 

11:00 Among Consenting Adults 

An attempt to break down the walls of fear and ignor- 
ance about sex which still exist in today's "Liberated 
Society." Hosts Barbara Spark and Jeremy Shapiro in- 
vite you to participate by phone. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 
9:30 



10:00 



25 



Wed n e s d a 



Sunrise Concert 

The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Tolstoy's novella, read by Bill Hunt. 

Ethnic Music: Richland Women 

Produced by Joanne Erde and Roberta Friedman. 



11:00 Inside LA 

Earl Ofari selects excerpts from his Saturday program. 

11:30 Women for Legislative Action 

Hosted by Dorothy Eletz. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

A concert by members of the Festival Players of California 
recorded March 6, I974 in KPFK's Auditorium. Handel: 
Sonata in C Major; Schick hard: Sonata in G Minor; 
Froberger: Toccata; Gibbons: Queen's Command; 
Corelli: Sonata in F Major; Telemann: Sonata in A 
Minor. Ellen Perrin, recorders; Jan Kelley, cello; 
Sharon Davis, harpsichord. Dorye Roettger provides 
informal commentary about the music and the 
musicians. Stereo. 



1:55 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

2:00 Play of the Week: Major Barbara 

This George Bernard Shaw piay is continued from 
Wednesday the 18th, at 2:00 p.m. 

4:00 Food for Thought 

A new way of thinking about nutrition and health, 
with recipes, even! Milli Martinez hosts. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 



8:30 



9:30 



11:00 



The Evening News 

Charles Morgan: Commentary 

Beyond the News 

Open Hour 




Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XXI 

Schoenberg— the composer, the teacher, the man- 
reminiscences and recollections by those who knew him: 
Leonard Stein, Clara Steurermann, Natalie Limonick, 
Ernst Krenek, Paul Pisk, Gerald Strang, Luciano 
Berio, Lukas Foss, William Malloch, and the composer's 
sons, Ronald and Lawrence Schoenberg. Produced 
by David Cloud. Stereo 

The Mann Lectures 

Recorded by the Library of Congress, and an oft- 
requested favorite of KPFK listeners, the series includes 
4 topics discussed by the writer between 1942 and 
1949. Tonight: The War and the Future 

Cops and Computers 

This program will trace the history and development of 
the super-international police establishment INTERPOL. 
Special focus is on the agency's current emphasis on 
computer data banks for crime detection and intelligence 
activities. 



12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



27 



26 



Th u r s d a y 



27 



Fri d a y 



6:00 
9:25 
9:30 

10:00 
11:00 



12:00 

2:00 

3:30 

4:00 

5:00 

6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 
8:30 



10:30 



11:30 
12:00 



Sunrise Concert 

Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Tolstoy's novella, read by Bill Hunt. 

Folk Dance with Mario 

Ethnic songs and dances from all around the world, 
presented by Mario Casetta. 

From the Center: The Human Factor in 
Government-Press Relations 

The quality of the people chosen to execute our foreign 
policy and their relationship with media reporters are 
critical variables in the working of our government. 
To discuss these factors, a panel of journalists and 
and scholars join John Kenneth Galbraith and James 
C. Thomson, Jr. 

Noon Concert 

Beethoven: The three Rasumowsky Quartets, op. 59, 
nos. 1-3; Vegh Quartet (Telefunken SPA 250961. 
Kathenne Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

The Mann Lectures 

Rebroadcast from Wednesday the 25th, at 9:30 p.m. 

Matrix 

Rebroadcast from Tuesday the 24th, at 10:30 p.m. 

Folk Scene 

Hosted by Roz and Howard Larmon. 

Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

The Evening News 

William Winter: News Analysis 

Beyond the News 

Open Hour 

Cleveland Orchestra— Live in Concert 

Bach: Piano concerto- Lorin Hollander, piano. 
Strauss: Burleske. Janacek: Slavonic Mass- 
Janice Yoes, soprano; Lili Chookasian, alto; 
Henry Grossman, tenor; Ara Berbenan, bass; 
Blossom Festival Chorus. Aldo Ceccato conducts. 
Robert Conrad hosts. Stereo. 

The Fables of India 

The fable is perhpas the oldest of literary forms. In 
India it is probably the closest to the original store of 
folk lore. Zia Mahjeddin, actor, presents a collection 
of tales that is intended to teach how to rule with 
wisdom and justice (our signal area includes 
San Clemente.) 

Apogee: Mitchell Harding 

Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

Bill Hunt reads the final installment of Tolstoy's novella. 

10:00 Ethnic Music: East meets West 

With Saya and Mario. 

11:00 Soviet Report: William Winter 

KPFK News Analyst William Winter traveled 
through Soviet Union with a portable tape recorder, 
the results of which will appear every Friday morning. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Music from New Zealand 

Elgar: Froissart Overture; Peter Sculthorpe: Music 
for Japan; Malcolm Arnold: English Dances; Britten: 
Four Sea Interludes from "Peter Grimes"; Sibelius: 
Symphony No. 6; Jack Body: 23 Pages. New 
Zealand Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra 
John Hopkins, Alex Lindsey, and Hein Jordan conducting. 
David Cloud hosts. Program material courtesy New 
Zealand Broadcasting Corporation. Stereo. 

2:00 Critique 

Rebroadcast of On Film and In Print. 

2:30 The Sour Apple Tree 

Clare Spark chooses a past program to rebroadcast. 

3:30 Contemporary Art Forum 

International and local news and opinion on the 
contemporary visual arts, produced by Clark Polak. 

4:00 Survive with Pleasure 

Wina Sturgeon's Way of Thinking, with open phones. 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:40 Report to the Listener: Will Lewis 

6T45 Consumer Report 

7:00 Beyond the News 

7:30 Foreign Press 

Latin America: Professor Donald Bray, CSULA. 
Japan: Professor Hans Baerwald. 

8:00 Poetry-Live 

9:00 Mundo Chicano 

Music and guests of interest to the Chicano community. 
Hosted by Antonio Salazar 

11.00 Hour 25: sf 

Science fiction, science, and things that go boomp in 
your radio. With Mike Hodel, John Henry Thong and 
Katherine Calkin, 

2:00 Soft Core Phonography 

Mellow music and old radio shows, with Jay Lacey. 



28 



28 



Sat u r d a y 



29 



Sun day 



8:00 Trans: Seals & Crofts 

The first of a seriews of 3 programs related to the 
Bahai faith. J. Farrell talks with 2 of the most talented 
musician-composers in contemporary popular music about 
how the love of God is expressed in their work. With 
musical selections. 



Halfway Down the Stairs 

Songs, stories, fun for kids and others, with Uncle Ruthie. 



9:30 

10:30 Folk Music: John Davis 



12:30 The Car Show 

De-mystify your car with Jack and John. 

1:30 Preachin' the Blues: Bruce Bromberg 

3:00 IMommo 

Contemporary soulsounds, with Tambuzi Nyamavu. 

4:30 Inside L.A. 

Examining socail, political and cultural happenings in 
L.A, Featurings guests, interviews, commentary by 
Ron Ridenour, and jazz interludes. Produced by 
Earl Ofari. 

5:50 Weekend Calendar: Terry Hodel 
6:00 The Saturday News: Larry Moss 

6:30 KPFK and the First Amendment 

A documentary detailing KPFK s fight to retain 
confidentiality in the case of the SLA tape and the 
Weather Underground letter. In the course of that 
battle, KPFK's manager Will Lewis went to jail. 
Produced by Mike Hodel. 

8:00 Arnold Schoenberg: The First 100 Years-XXII 

Pianist Leonard Stein plays all of Schoenberg's published 
solo piano music — Three Pieces, Op. 1 1 ; Six Little 
Pieces, Op. 19, Five Pieces, Op. 23; Two Pieces, Op. 
33— as well as the unpublished Three Early Pieces of 
1894. He is joined by pianist John Newell for a perfor- 
mance of the Chamber Symphony No. 2, Op. 38, ar- 
ranged for two pianos by Schoenberg. David Cloud 
hosts and talks with Leonard Stein about his unique 
association with the compower. Recorded with the 
Dolby "A" noise reduction system. Stereo. 

10:00 The William Malloch Programme 

A musical (mostly classical) treasure hunt conducted by 
the critic, composer, and former KPFK music director. 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 



6:00 Poetry-Dead 

Rebroadcast from the 18th Century, 2 p.m. 

8:00 Netherlands Church Organs 

Organ of the Messiah Church, Wassenaar: Music by 
Sweelinck, Praetorius, van Noordt, and Van den 
Kerckhoven played by Ton Koopman. Organ of the 
Openhofkerk, Rotterdam: Music by Clerambault, 
Stanley, and Bartelink played by Bernard Bartelink. 
Program material courtesy of Radio Nederland. Stereo. 

9:00 Bio-Meditation with Jack Gariss 

Experiential, experimental exploration of states 
of consciousness. 

10:00 Come to Life: Herschel Lymon 

A human growth center of the air. 

10:45 Many Worlds: Mario Casetta 

Ethnic songs and dances from every corner of the world. 

11:30 Dorothy Healey 

A communist viewpoint, with open phones. 

12:30 Above and Beyond the News 

The best sections of the previous week's Beyond the 
News. Interviews, reports from Washington, Sacramento, 
the world, etc. Produced by the News Department. 

1:00 Tenor of the Times 

Fred Hyatt recalls his first program devoted to the 
superb gifts of the greatest heldenleben of them all, 
Lauritz Melcrtior. 

1:30 The Sunday Opera 

Verdi: II Trovatore. Soloists: Zinka Milanov, Jussi 
Bjoerling, Leonard Warren, Fedora Barbieri. Renato 
Cellini conducts. (RCA LM 6008) Fred Hyatt hosts. 

5:00 Margaret Wright On Schools 

Telling it like it is, with open phones. 

6:00 The Sunday News: Sanford Fidell 
6:30 The Sour Apple Tree: Clare Spark 

Is there any redeeming social value to art? 

7:30 Music Not For Export: The Australian Scene 

Felix Werder: String Quartet /X-The Austral String 
Quartet; Violin Concerto-Leonard Dommett, violin; 
Melbourne Symphony Orchestra/Fritz Rieger. 

8:30 Carlos Hagen Presents 

The Sounds and Soul of Rural America. Carlos Hagen 
presents the favorite sounds and artists of the country, 
rural and working America and the often controversial 
messages they convey. 

9:30 Folkscene 

A program of traditional and contemporary folk music, 
with live performers and some records too. Hosted by 
the Larmons. 

12:00 Music Black and W+iite 

Blues and bluegrass, hosted by Nawana Davis. 



29 



30 



Mon day 



6:00 Sunrise Concert 

9:30 The Morning Reading: Kreutzer Sonata 

The final reading of this relatively long short story 
by Leo Tolstoy. Read by Bill Hunt. 

10:00 Ethnic Music 

Sandy Jules hosts this salute to Caribbean sounds. 

11:00 What is a Railfan? 

Thomas Wolfe, James Agee, Lily Pons, Franklin 
Roosevelt and Robert Kennedy loved the rails. 
This hour focuses on people who have had a love affair 
with the transportation on rails, to find out why' 
The hosts of this charming and informative hour are 
Harry Anderson and Kris Welch. 

12:00 Noon Concert 

Katherine Calkin and/or David Cloud host a program of 
. new releases. Stereo. 

2:00 KPFK and the First Amendment 

Rebroadcast from Saturday the 28th, at 6:30 p.m. 

3:30 Matrix V: Access at Home-Corporate, Political 
or Public? 

This program examines public access to the means and 
power of media. Participants include Richard L. Ottinger 
(N.Y. Congressman); Robert Lewis Shayon (Professor, 
Annenberg School of Communication); Kay Gardella 
(T.V. Critic, New York Daily News): Nicholas Johnson 
(Former FCC Commissioner); and others. 



9:30 (Mo Appointment Necessary: The Professionals 

Tonight's professional, lawyer David. Finkel looks at law. 

10:30 Chapel, Court and Countryside: Renaissance and 
Early Baroque Music 

Monteverdi: Mass in Four Parts ( 1651 ). Missa Ave Domine 
Jesu Christe. Katherine Calkin hosts. Stereo. 

11:30 Redealing 

The best of the previous week's Dealing segments 

12:00 Captain Midnight: Rock, blues, monotone news 




4:00 Organic Gardening 

5:00 Dealing 

News and views set to music, produced by Barbara Cady. 

6:00 The Evening News 

6:45 Conservative Commentary: Bob Karp 

A view from the right side. 

7:00 Beyond the News 
7:30 Open Hour 
8:30 La Raza Nueva 

East L. A. City: Si o No? On November 5th, citizens 
in East L.A. will vote on whether or not to make that 
area a city. Host Moctezuma Esparza will discuss the 
matter with representatives from both sides of the issue. 
Produced by Victor Vazquez. 



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Announcement to All Blind KPFK Subscribers 

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Classified 



BOOKS 

International Book Shop 

4120 E. Anaheim Street 
Long Beach, Ca. 438 1694 
(2 blocks east of Termmo) 
Hours: 19-6 pm, Tues, thru Sat 

Papa Bach Book Shop 

11312 Santa Monica Blvd! 
West Los Angeles 
Open Sunday til 9 
Dial: GRUBERG 

The Long March Bookstore 
Newsreel Documentary Films 

715 South Parkview Street 
Los Angeles, Ca 
Phone: (213) 384 3856 



INSTRUCTION 

Art Workshop Studio Classes 

Zerner Studio. Children/adults, Paint- 
ing, clay, mixed media, sm. classes. 
Beverely Glenn near Mulholland. 
Call 474-1349 before 9:00 a.m. 

Claydance a new concept in Ceramic 
Sculpture. One's body as living sculpture 
Yoga, free-form body movement (in re- 
sponse to music, poetry, etc.) are used to 
concentrate, stimulate and then focus 
energy on the medium of clay. Instructor 
Maxine Rothberg. Santa Monica or 
Venice studio. 395-6045 

Crossroads School Grades 7-12 
Co-ed, independent day school, balanc- 
ing traditional acad. excellence w/warm 
innovative humanistic environment 
Small classes, individual attention, 
master teachers. Write: Dr. Paul 
Cummins, Director 1974-75 
1714 21st St . Santa Monica 90404. Or 
call 828-3260 

Musicians and Singers 

More time than money' It takes only 
$5 and whatever time you have to start 
to learn sight-singing, theory, harmony 
or arranqing. Ron Webb 628 5025 

New Directions School, For parents 

who want happy kids. Private, non-pro- 
fit school for ages 5-16, emphasizing 
decision-making and self-direction. 2452 
Pacific Ave., Long Beach CA 90814 
(213) 424-4875 

The Loving Touch 

For expanded awareness and sensitivity: 
a 2 day workshop exploring caring, sen- 
sual, intimate massage for loving couples. 
For brochure: Soma Institute for Body 
Therapy 823-7009 



The Power of Women 
L.A. Convention Center, Sept. 20-22. 
Unique training experience for women 
by leaders of excellence. You choose 
6 94 7 workshops on Business games. 
Lobbying Techniques, Job Interviewing, 
Alinsky Organizing, Self-Assertion, 
Personal Power, Lesbian Power, Union 
Power, Promoting-Advertising, etc. 
Call (213) 392-8809 or 392-1229, or 
write: Women's Center, c/o Leigh, 
2501 Ocean Fromt, Venice 90290 for 
brochure/information. HURRY! 

USC Conference: Piagetian Theory 
and the Helping Professions. January 24, 
1975: Info: WPHC USC. LA, 90007 



SERVICES 

Acupressure Massage Therapy 

Oriental & Reichen energy balancing tech- 
niques for tension, release, body integra- 
tion & lelaxation. Registered Massage 
Therapist. For app. call Cindee at Soma 
Institute, 823-7009. 

Carpet Cleaning 
Upholstery Cleaning 

Ralph Meyer - 454-2334 

Eleven years servinq KPFK listeners! 

First Unitarian Church of 
Los Angeles 

"The church of contemporary involvement' 

Peter Christiansen, Minister 

Educational activities 

Waldemar Hille, Organist 

Sunday Services - 1 1 :00 am 

2936 W. Eighth Street (near Vermont) 

Graphologist 

Handwriting Analysis for Individuals or 
for Parties. References available. Rates 
cheerfully quoted. Norman R. Bottom, 
Ph.D., (714) 842-9889 

Home Cleaning 

A complete service. 

Licensed -Insured -Bonded 

Michael Parmely "Little Guy" 396-0488 , 

Licensed Painting & Decorating 

Residential, Interior, Exterior 
For free estimate, call 
SISKIND - 933-1091, eveninqs 

Men & Women's Hairstyling 

Scissor cutting, naturals, blow-dry cuts 
Ms. Jackie, KPFK subscriber 
Sundays only, call for app't. 837-5367 

Peace Press 

Printing for the People 
870-5159 



Save your Sight 

By the Dr. Bates Method 
of Eye Training 
By Appointment Only 
(2131 244-2803 



31 



Sculptured Hair Styling 

For Men and Women 

Including conditioning, body perms, 

and coloring. Call Tracie Ray at 

(213) 466 5590 or come to 7621 Sunset 

Blvd. in Hollywood. FREE parking, rear. 



PLACES 



mscomff 



•48 



ZHH 



*&• 



Natural Foods to A (jourmet s Taste. 
Phone 455-9079 for reservations. 
Rich and Marj Dehr. 

Closed Tuesdays. 

tor (Amv wfc, at* 

*w*oughtoaa* 

I Kaiser's W 

. Dlnnor Daily from 5 P.M. 

unch Hon. Him Frl Iron 11:30 » M 

ALL CREDIT CARDS HONORED 

13625 Vontura Hid., Shorman Oiki. 713 5616 

East of Woodman < 




Plan to spend your summer vacation in 
the Santa Cruz Mountains. For reservations 
information, write to P.O Box 828, 
Soquel, Ca or call GReenwood 5 9995 
or 9552 (area code 408) 



KPFK Folio Advertising Rates 

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ALL month long. Please call KPFK to 
discuss your special advertising needs. 

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preceding publication date 

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in advance. Please include check with 
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is subject to publisher's approval 



32 



rhe Pacific Coast Friends of Music' 
present . 



U6IC1 



lHacipica 



► 



PAUL VORWERK, DIRECTOR 



1974 -75 Series 
BACH & THE BAROQUE 



4 



13 Oct. Monteverdi, Buxtehude, Bach 

17 Wov. Schuetz,Schein& Monteverdi 

15 Dec. All Bach Program(magnificat) 
2 / Dec. ChristmasEveConcert (11pm 
19 Dec. Monteverdi, Gesualdo,Lawes 

3 Feb. Purcell(Dido&Aeneas),Bach 

16 Mar. Monteverdi & Schuetz 



SI \l> l¥SAT8:00P.M. 

Fritchman Auditorium-2936 W.8th 
{% block east of Vermont),L.A. 

Series Tickets-S18 (save 25%) 
Single Tickets-$4 — (student rush S2I 

Send to Pacific Coast Friends of Music, PO 
Box 49224. LA 90049-1213) 393-0576 

Please send me tickets to the 1974-75 

Series. I enclose $ 

No tickets, but send brochure and add 
my name to the mailing list. 



Street, City, Zip 



ARNOLD SCHOENBERG 

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

September 12-15, USC 
Friday Evening, Sept. 13 

Site Dedication, Champagne Reception, and 
Banquet with Music with guests Marni Nixon, 
Leonard Stein, Milton Babbitt and more. 
Public Invited: $12.50 per person 



2 FREE CONCERTS 



Saturday, Sept. 14, 8:00 

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

String Trio Op. 45 

Six Songs 

Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 21 



Sunday, Sept. 15,4:30 
GERHARD SAMUEL conducts 
YMF DEBUT ORCHESTRA 
with Betty Allen, mezzo 
Laurence Lesser, cellist 



USC BOVARD AUDITORIUM 



Information & Fellowships, call (213) 746-7936 



CHILDREN'S MUSIC CENTER 

More than a record shop. . . a center staffed by consultants trained 
to help parents and teachers select the finest records and books for- 
any age, from pre-school to beyond the university. Here you will not 
find the trite or the violent; only what stimulates children to move, 
listen, play an instrument, relax or create. We are especially proud 
of our tremendous collections of material on history and contributions 
of Black and Spanish-speaking Americans; the best of our own heritage 
and that of people everywhere. 

Children's Music Center 

Open Tues. thru Sat, 9-5:30 5373 W. Pico., L.A. 90019 

Closed Sundays & Mondays 937 1825 



ANTIOCH COLLEGE/WEST 
A University without Walls 







w 



is interested in offering individualized college programs to self-motivated, independent 
students. We offer fully accretdited master's degree programs in psychology and 
urban studies and bachelor's degree programs in a variety of areas including: 
sociology media and communications 

Black Studies the arts 

Women's Studies journalism 

community development philosophy 

history ecology 

political science business 

law psychology 

literature urban studies (other majors available ) 

Credit towards completion of the degree programs may be extended for past or present experiential learning as well 
as academic learning. A nine month minimum enrollment is required. Eligibility for the bachelor's degree may 
take from one to three years, depending on the student's previous learning. We are approved for veterans benefits; 
financial aid is available. Please call or write for information. 



Antioch College/West 

1067 North Fairfax Avenue 

Los Angeles, Calif. 90046 656-8520 



^3 



Haste & Hirsty Volvo Pacific 

11647 Ventura Blvd., Studio City 

(3 blocks East of Laurel Canyon) (VOLVO) 

Phone: 766-3847 or 877 0864 

FACTORY AUTHORIZED DEALER 
FACTORY TRAINED MECHANICS 
LEASE PLAN AVAILABLE 
OVERSEAS DELIVERY 
SPECIALISTS 



FIAT 



musical 

heRitaqe 

society 

has an unusual catalog of music 

from the Baroque era to the present day, 

available by mail order only. 

Write for a free catalog. 

I9«i »oo»6 *iy, new yoak, n. y. ioom 



■■■■■'■ ■'■' "" '■" I "| 

Lanny May Be Gone, But His Tongue Lives On' 

Those Blue Chip Stamps cluttering up 

Your kitchen drawer and glove compartment 

can mean needed supplies for KPFK. 

SEND THOSE STAMPS! 

td: Lanny the Tongue 

Si^k KPFK 

North Hollywood 
91608 




% lfcftlPniGOTfeClAL 



books t ore &.distri butors 
I33S^ W.Wafehinaton Bi. 



Venice .CaSoat 



the phcme-li3-39Z-7m2 ~ 
hours -rw | • 12-V-fSot Sun ■ 12-b 




A SCHOOL THAT TEACHES 

Jewish Soul 

Meets at Santa Monica Y.M.C.A. 
1336 6th St., Santa Monica 



Sholem's a non-profit, non- 
religious co-op Sunday school 
in its 18th year. Dedicated to 
comprehensive exploration of 
Jewish History, Culture, and 
Values thru the rich story of 
history, song, drama, arts and 



lnformation-390 5431/451-3868 holiday celebrations. 



LAEMMLE FINE ARTS THEATERS 



LOS FELIZ 
N04-2169 



ESQUIRE 
Pasadena 
SY3-6149 
MU4-1774 



PLAZA 

Westwood 
TR9-9077 
GR7-0097 



REGENT 
Westwood 
BR2 0501 
477-0059 



THE ROYAL 
11523 S.M. 
Blvd., W.L.A. 
473-1636 
270-4110' 



Alan Bates in 
"King of Hearts' 



Call theater for program 



coming soon: 

"The Seduction of Mimi 



coming soon: 
"Turkish Delight' 



"Tall Blonde Man with 
One Black Shoe" 



MONICA TWIN THEATERS 
always a choice of 2 outstanding programs 



MONICA I 
451-8686 



MONICA II 
451-8686 
451 8688 



Call theater for program 



call theater for program 



33 



llscount records 



©t 



The finest selection on records and tapes 
in all categories of music, with the best, 
most knowledgeable service in town. 



270 No. Beverly Dr. 
Sun -Thurs 10-6 30 
Fri., Sat: 10-10 



609 So. Olive St. 
Mon-Sat 10-630 
Closed Sun. 



CONSIDER 

A DISPLAY AD IN THE FOLIO: 

The Folio is sent free to every subscriber to 
KPFK. That means your ad will be seen all 
month long by more than 15,000 people, not 
to mention their friends, family, etc. 

CALL LUCIA, 877-2711, for more Information. 



Last Year You May Have Thrown Away 
$1000. This Year, 
Let the 3729 Club 
Help You Get It Back! 




Last month, over 180 new and renewed members of the KPFK 3729 Club were filed 
with the Community Consumer's Council. They have entered into a radical-economic 
adventure: integrating their interest in KPFK Free Radio and increasing their own 
financial rationality. For a tax deductible pittance ($60 in one giant lump or $65 in 
payments with $25 down and $5 a month) the 3729 Club— CCC members get two 
always free admissions to our exciting but sometimes strange Film of the Month Club, 
and CCC membership which now includes receiving the Consumer Action News- 
letter which is being expanded to include more consumer news, CCC buying discount 
on discount benefits on all sorts of consumer goodies from electronic equipment, 
furniture, automobiles and parts, and a range of brand new just off the assembly line 
benefits like 20 percent discount on the Hertz standard auto rental rate, a small car 
buyer advisory program, a computerized health examination, an expanded recreation 
spot discount, and new travel opportunities. KPFK receives your extra support,. and 
you get the PEACE OF MIND of knowing you are doing a super thing for our 

experiment and fight and with the help of the CCC, you can save money, hopefully 

more than you give to KPFK (so maybe you can give more even!). 
JOIN CONVERT 8AVE BE HAPPY AND HEALTHY SUPPORT AND 

KNOW THAT WARM FEELING OF SELF RIGHTEOUSNESS WHICH COMES TO ALL 
3729 CLUB MEMBERS DURING OUR PLEAS FOR FINANCIAL MONEY FUNDS ! ! ! 



ALIVE 



(Americans for Lifelong Vigor 
and a Vital Existence) 



Keevt 
item 



An estimated one third of all canned pet food 
is being consumed by poor people 
mostly old poor people. 



"Yes, they call themselves ALIVE. It's about time we 
older people got a break. And, they don't leave out 
younger people, just as long as they can share the same 
goal of a healthy standard of living and a high standard 
of life for ALL_ Americans. This makes me happy too: These 
people believe in continuing education and meaningful work; 
They say our money will go further if we live cooperatively 
rather than all alone; They know all about nutrition, vitinii 
and minerals. I think the women will like this too. Let 1 
forget bench sitting and get busy helping ourselves and 
each other." 





ALIVE is a non profit, non-partisan, 
non-sectarian movement dedicated to a 
healthy standard of living and a high 
standard of life. Most members are 
older citizens. . .Our greatest and most 
neglected reservoir of wisdom, decency 
and productivity. 



OUR PROGRAM: A cooperative community 
to end loneliness and financial hard- 
ship • Continuing education and meaningful 
work • We use food stamps for cooperative 
food purchases • We support government 
paid total medical care, elimination of 
junk foods from the government's Surplus 
Commodity Foods Program and the right to 
enjoy a clean environment with social 
justice and equality for all people. 



HERE'S WHAT WE'RE DOING FOR OURSELVES — We already have facilities for the first 
cooperative community. Each member of this community will contribute their monthly 
retirement benefits or the equivalent. Members will operate several small businesses 
to build the community wealth. 

Be ALIVE! We need your skill and your wisdom and your experience. Please indicate 
your interest by writing to us for more information. Our address: ALIVE, 1312 N. 
Stanley Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90046. 



AFRICAN ART FOR EVERYONE 

Pre-Bicentennial Offer 



Priced for Everyone 




LIMITED EDITION 



M-002 




The above prints are reproductions ol authentic African Art, gome dating before 1776. Reproductions are in exquisite 
color revealing the excellent workmanship and quality enhanced by the materials of carved wood, beautifully hand 
painted in several colors. 

Our Pre-Bicentennial offer is to make it possible for all of our friends and every Black who appreciates art to display 
with pride in home, office, business, dormitory, school etc., the best in African Art available. 

The African Arts Cultural Center has been established to help develop an awareness of outstanding contributions by 
Black Peoples of the World. 

Order your prints today. Enclose $4.00 check or money order to cover cost and mailing PAYABLE TO: African Arts 
Cultural Center, P.O. Box 36405 L.A. 90036 
l Allow three weeks for mailing) 



Advert isement 



DATED PROGRAM 

Time Value: Must Arrive By 

September 1, I974 



KPFK -^^ 

3729 Cahuenga Blvd., West 

North Hollywood, California 91604 



NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF 
PERMIT NO. 30711 



91604JNC729 X 11/75 A 
ANGNYMOUSE 

3729 CAHJENGA BL 

NO. HOLLYWOOD CA S16C4